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Donald Trump Jr. blasts media for ignoring Hunter Biden report: 'I was front page news for weeks' while Bid… – Fox News

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Donald Trump Jr. slammed the media for largely ignoring the damning revelations from the GOP-led Senate report on Hunter Biden’s foreign financial ties.

The Senate Homeland Security and Finance Committees on Wednesday released an interim report on their months-long joint investigation into Hunter Biden’s role on the board of Ukrainian natural gas firm Burisma Holdings and his alleged “extensive and complex financial transactions,” but also highlighted his questionable transactions with Russian and Chinese nationals.

None of the revelations, however, were given much coverage by many of the major news networks.

CNN and all three nightly news programs on ABC, CBS and NBC avoided the subject. MSNBC host Rachel Maddow was the only host on the network to address the Senate report but spent those roughly two minutes of coverage downplaying it.

Trump Jr. blasted the lack of coverage of the Senate report, suggesting a stark double standard between himself and the former VP’s son.

CNN, BROADCAST NETWORKS IGNORE HUNTER BIDEN REVELATIONS, OTHERS DOWNPLAY SENATE REPORT

“When they thought they had me for something much less significant than direct payments from an associate of Vladimir Putin & direct links to human trafficking/prostitution in Russia, I was front page news for weeks on end but the Bidens get a pass for their corruption as always!” Trump Jr. exclaimed on Thursday.

Trump Jr. was likely referring to the infamous Trump Tower meeting with Russian nationals that he attended during the 2016 election that was intensely scrutinized by both the Mueller investigation and the mainstream media.

The news outlets that did cover the Hunter Biden report, however, portrayed the Senate Republicans’ findings as if there were no new revelations.

HEMINGWAY: JOE BIDEN BRIEFED ON SON’S BURISMA INVOLVEMENT, SENATE REPORT SAYS

The New York Times ran the headline, “Republican Inquiry Finds No Evidence of Wrongdoing by Biden.” Politico similarly ran, “GOP senators’ anti-Biden report repackages old claims” as did BuzzFeed News’ “Republicans’ Hunter Biden Report is Filled With Old, Unsubstantiated Allegations and Debunked Theories.”

The Washington Post went even further to exonerate the former VP with its headline, “GOP senators’ report calls Hunter Biden’s board position in Ukraine ‘problematic’ but doesn’t show it changed US policy.”

Critics also pointed out that many of the written reports neglected to mention the Senate report’s key findings regarding Hunter Biden’s $3.5 million Russian wire transfer and his business ties with Chinese nationals.

In addition to new findings regarding Biden’s ties to Burisma, the report states that Senate investigators found millions of dollars in “questionable financial transactions” between Hunter Biden, who is a son of Democrat presidential candidate Joe Biden, and his associates and foreign individuals, including the wife of the former mayor of Moscow as well as individuals with ties to the Chinese Communist Party.

HANNITY: HUNTER BIDEN REPORT SHOULD DISQUALIFY FATHER FROM PRESIDENCY

According to the report, an investment firm co-founded by Hunter Biden, Rosemont Seneca Thornton, “received $3.5 million in a wire transfer” from Elena Baturina, the wife of the former mayor of the Russian capital.

The report goes further and alleges that not just Hunter Biden but other members of the Biden family “were involved in a vast financial network that connected them to foreign nationals and foreign governments across the globe.”

In one instance, the report stated that Hunter Biden “opened a bank account” with a Chinese national linked to China’s communist government, which “financed a $100,000 global spending spree” for the former vice president’s brother, James Biden, and his wife, Sara Biden.

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Biden campaign spokesman Andrew Bates on Wednesday blasted the investigation, and Johnson directly, for pursuing a “conspiracy theory.”

“As the coronavirus death toll climbs and Wisconsinites struggle with joblessness, Ron Johnson has wasted months diverting the Senate Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs Committee away from any oversight of the catastrophically botched federal response to the pandemic, a threat Sen. Johnson has dismissed by saying that ‘death is an unavoidable part of life.’ Why? To subsidize a foreign attack against the sovereignty of our elections with taxpayer dollars — an attack founded on a long-disproven, hardcore rightwing conspiracy theory that hinges on Sen. Johnson himself being corrupt and that the Senator has now explicitly stated he is attempting to exploit to bail out Donald Trump’s re-election campaign,” Bates said in a statement Wednesday.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman contributed to this report.

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Grieving Paradise mother finds strength by writing social media blog – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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PARADISE, N.L. —

Pam Myles’ home looks as inviting as her greeting when she answers the door.

“Come in,” she says, with a warm smile.

“Don’t mind the mess,” she adds, as she walks into her living room, where a baby Exersaucer and a handful of toys rest on top of a section of colourful children’s foam floor tiles.

Other than the faint lull from the television, there’s little sound in the house as her six-month-old son, Lukas, naps in his room at the other end of the house.

“This is the time of day that’s hardest for me,” she said.

“It’s the daytime when it’s quiet.”

Normally, there would be an energetic young boy running around, likely wearing nothing but underwear, singing “Wheels on the Bus,” and climbing on a chair insisting that he help his mother wash dishes or cook supper, anxious to get a butter knife to cut up mushrooms.

“Noah was a force,” Myles said, her face lighting up. “He was busy — super, super busy. I can’t exaggerate enough how busy he was. He was bright and curious.

“And loud,” she added, laughing.

She would give anything to hear those sounds again, but they’ve been silenced forever.


Noah Saja. - Rosie Mullaley
Noah Zaja. – Contributed photo

On the morning of July 18, Myles’ four-year-old son, Noah, was killed in a tragic accident when he slipped out of the house, unknown to his mother, and got too close to a closing tow-long dump trailer in front of their Paradise home.

Dealing with such a heartbreaking loss has been painfully difficult for Myles and her family, including her fiancé and Noah’s father, Marko, and daughter Avery, who celebrated her 11th birthday the day before Noah died.

“We’re doing OK,” Myles said, shrugging her shoulders and nodding her head. “OK is about as good as we can expect.

“There are no really great days, but there are lots of great things in every day.”

Not an hour goes by when she doesn’t think of Noah, and she will never erase memories of the morning he died. He had been in and out of the house, running from the playhouse in the back garden to the front garden of the house, which is nestled at the end of a quiet road in a Paradise subdivision.

When it got chilly, Myles grabbed Noah’s favourite sweater — a front zip-up, a gift from a family friend, and called him inside.

“I was putting it on him and I remember holding his face and saying to him, ‘You’re a good boy, Noah.’ That wasn’t uncommon. I told him all the time, but for some reason, in that moment, I felt the need to hold his face.

“I remember his response wasn’t like, ‘Oh, thank you.’ It was, ‘Yes, I am a good boy,’” she said, laughing.

An hour later he was gone.

“It was just so sudden,” she said. “He was just outside playing and had just been inside with us.”

“Noah Bear,” as she fondly referred to him, may not be running in and out of the house anymore, but his presence is everywhere in the home. Multiple photos of him, with his siblings, parents and friends, are placed on the walls, fireplace and side tables, his smiling face still lighting up each room.

It gives the family comfort and serves as a way of helping Lukas know his big brother, she said.

“That’s important to us,” Myles said, tearing up. “Noah was so excited about him and adored him. We plan to show Lukas (photos) and make sure he knows how special he was to Noah.”

She’s glad now she took so many pictures — her last order to Costco had 1,600 photos — and hundreds of videos of Noah since he was born.

Myles has remained fairly private since Noah’s death, but three months later feels comfortable enough to speak publicly about her experience.

Through tears, smiles and laughter, she explained that sharing her thoughts and feelings not only helps her express herself, but also helps others who have experienced similar tragedies.

Myles has started a Facebook blog, “Myles in my Shoes,” which she recently created after receiving so much response on her personal Facebook page.

In her first blog post last week, she wrote, “A popular Chinese proverb states that the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. I suppose this is mine. At least in such a public forum.”

She introduces herself in the blog as, “A mom of three: Avery, Noah and Lukas. I am the mother of two children I get to hold in my arms and one child I hold in my heart.”

“I’m not a writer,” said Myles, adding that her training as a child- and youth-care instructor at Eastern Academy and youth counsellor at the Janeway Children’s Hospital was helpful in managing her grief.

“It’s never something I felt I was particularly skilled at,” she says of writing.

As her eyes welled with tears, she paused before continuing. “But Noah’s life had so much meaning to us and I really wanted to try to also find some meaning in his loss.”

What she found was an overwhelming response from hundreds of people, many of whom wrote to tell her about their loss, the guilt they felt and the difficulty they felt moving on in life.

“It’s validating to me to know that other people also experience that, too.

“And they felt there was something in my message that made them feel less alone.”

Helping others has helped her heal, she said.

“Writing is helping me to piece my heart and life back together and I hope it brings some comfort to another,” she wrote.

It was also a way of saying thank you to the people across the province and country who contacted them and helped them the last three months, whether it was through fundraisers, delivered meals, or messages and well wishes.

“Somewhere in the midst of my deep pain and sorrow and darkness there was light,” she wrote in the blog.

“While I had every reason in the world to want the world to stop … to lay in my bed and lay in my grief … my two beautiful children, Marko, my friends and family and the community around us reminded me of my many reasons to be grateful — grateful for what I have, grateful for what I’ve gained and, mostly, grateful for the chance to have ever been and to be Noah’s mom.”

The community’s support is evident in the blue hearts that adorn many neighbours’ properties.

On the pavement in front of the family’s house, there’s a brightly painted smiley-faced sun and rainbow, with the words, “We love you,” care of the neighbours’ kids, Dylan and Abby.

It’s been comforting as they deal with the heartache.

In their lovely landscaped front garden, there are spots to honour Noah, from the painted rocks to a mini-memorial that includes the scooter he rode and his tiny crocks.

“Oh, he loved those crocks,” Myles said, smiling.

Noah’s grandmother, Barb Wagstaff, said the happy memories are what keeps the family going.

She remembers the pitter patter of his tiny feet going up the stairs to see his poppy, Larry Myles, the paintings for Mother’s Day and throwing grass in the pond “to feed the fish” at their cabin on Hodgewater Line. They’re memories she will cherish forever.

“There are reminders of him everywhere, like when I open the cupboard and see his favourite cereal,” Wagstaff said.

“The pain hits you in waves all the time. … I think about what he would be doing if he was here. … We value the time we had with him. He was such a blessing.”

She said she and Myles’ father feel mostly for her daughter, Marko and the children.

“As parents, you want to fix things (for your children), but we can’t fix it for her,” she said.

But Wagstaff said she admires her daughter for her strength and courage to express her feelings publicly.

“She’s been an inspiration to all of us,” Wagstaff said.

It’s been a difficult three months and it will be for many more to come as Myles deals with firsts without him and the challenges of figuring out what to say when asked how many children she has.

But for Myles, it’s her two remaining children who will get her through this the most.

“I remember Marko saying to me, no matter what happens, Lukas and Avery deserve to have the same parents they had (before Noah died),” she said.

“Not to say we won’t have time for sadness and grief, but that they deserved for us to pick up, to do things they were accustomed to. That was going to be really important.

“So, with that in mind, we get up every day and do what we need to do to be the best parents we can be for the kids.”

And in the quiet of her days, it’s that which has become loud and clear.


Rosie Mullaley is the human interest reporter for The Telegram

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Japan mulls $95.5 billion extra budget to counter coronavirus: media – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s government is considering compiling an extra budget worth around $95.5 billion to offset the economic drag caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the Mainichi newspaper reported on Saturday.

The government is likely to debate using the 10 trillion yen ($95.52 billion) budget to extend a labour subsidy programme scheduled to end in December and to pay for the distribution of a coronavirus vaccine, the Mainichi reported, without citing sources.

Members of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party are calling for 10 trillion yen in spending, and Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga is likely to formally order an extra budget early next month, the Mainichi said.

The finance ministry and the prime minister’s office did not respond when contacted by phone.

The government may consider whether to use some of the funds to extend a popular domestic travel subsidy scheme but is unlikely to offer more direct cash handouts to households, the newspaper reported.

The government has 7 trillion yen in reserves left over from an earlier coronavirus aid package that it can use to fund the extra budget. The government is considering issuing bonds to fund the remaining amount, according to the Mainichi.

Japan’s government and ruling party lawmakers originally planned to make a decision on extra stimulus after the release of third-quarter gross domestic product on Nov. 16 but decided to bring forward their decision because private sector companies are starting to cut workers’ bonus payments, the newspaper said.

($1 = 104.6900 yen)

(Reporting by Stanley White; Editing by Lincoln Feast.)

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Japan mulls $95.5 billion extra budget to counter coronavirus: media – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s government is considering compiling an extra budget worth around $95.5 billion to offset the economic drag caused by the coronavirus pandemic, the Mainichi newspaper reported on Saturday.

The government is likely to debate using the 10 trillion yen ($95.52 billion) budget to extend a labour subsidy programme scheduled to end in December and to pay for the distribution of a coronavirus vaccine, the Mainichi reported, without citing sources.

Members of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party are calling for 10 trillion yen in spending, and Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga is likely to formally order an extra budget early next month, the Mainichi said.

The finance ministry and the prime minister’s office did not respond when contacted by phone.

The government may consider whether to use some of the funds to extend a popular domestic travel subsidy scheme but is unlikely to offer more direct cash handouts to households, the newspaper reported.

The government has 7 trillion yen in reserves left over from an earlier coronavirus aid package that it can use to fund the extra budget. The government is considering issuing bonds to fund the remaining amount, according to the Mainichi.

Japan’s government and ruling party lawmakers originally planned to make a decision on extra stimulus after the release of third-quarter gross domestic product on Nov. 16 but decided to bring forward their decision because private sector companies are starting to cut workers’ bonus payments, the newspaper said.

($1 = 104.6900 yen)

(Reporting by Stanley White; Editing by Lincoln Feast.)

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