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Galaxy S11 rumors and leaks: Feb. release date, massive battery, 108 megapixels – CNET

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An artist’s rendition of the Galaxy S11, based on the rumors and leaks.


Screenshot by Jessica Dolcourt/CNET from Concept Creator

New year, new class of phones, including the Samsung Galaxy S11. Samsung’s devices made waves in 2019, from the Editor’s Choice award-winning Galaxy Note 10 Plus to the unforgettable Galaxy Fold. 2020 is only destined to get better. (And that goes for Samsung’s next foldable phone, too.) 

The industry is already buzzing with leaks and predictions as we approach 2020, about everything from the the Galaxy S11’s official lineup and price, to the camera setup and battery (hint: it could be massive). I throw in my own educated guesses too, because Samsung often follows historical patterns and topical trends, so certain things make sense.

For example, the Galaxy S11 will be the first of Samsung’s four 5G phones to deliver on the 5G promise in a meaningful way. Samsung got a start with 5G this year, with the S10 5G, Note 10 Plus 5G, Galaxy A90 5G and Fold (in the UK and South Korea), but many are variants of 4G devices that already exist. The Galaxy S11 family of phones is a mainstream handset that has the ability to help bring 5G’s faster data speeds to the masses.

There are a lot more supposed specs to absorb, so here they are — the Galaxy S11’s most important rumored features so far, plus what we don’t know and what we think we might get.


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Galaxy S11 is apparently going to be big. Very big

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Three models, three sizes: Galaxy S11, S11 Plus, S11 Pro

First things first. The Galaxy S11 isn’t going to be one phone, that we know. It’s rumored to be three, just like last year’s S10 family of 4G models. 

Some rumors name the phones as the S11E, S11 and S11 Plus, but more recent whispers, including that from frequent Twitter leaker Evan Blass, suggest S11, S11 Plus and S11 Pro, which is a lot closer to Apple’s strategy with the iPhone 11, which is the base model for that line.

2019-12-20-13-00-302019-12-20-13-00-30

Screenshot by ZDNet

Here are the rumored screen sizes:

  • Galaxy S11: 6.2-inch or 6.4-inch
  • Galaxy S11 Plus: 6.7-inch
  • Galaxy S11 Pro: 6.9-inch

Blass also stated that all the Galaxy S11 phones could have curved sides, unlike 2019’s Galaxy S10E, which had a flat display that I sometimes preferred.

galaxy-s11-plus-1galaxy-s11-plus-1

A peek at the Galaxy S11? We’ll know soon enough.


Cashkaro

February 11 or 18 launch, later release dates

The all-important question: When do we get to see this thing for the first time? February is a given. Samsung has unveiled its Galaxy S series in late February or early March for years, sometimes at the Mobile World Congress tech show (a.k.a MWC), sometimes before, and a couple of times, even after.

If Samsung follows last year’s model, we’ll see the Galaxy S11 and its kin appear shortly before MWC. If we let the rumors guide us, Samsung will show its hand on either Tues, Feb. 11 (this is in Greek) or Tues, Feb. 18. So yeah, February seems solid.

Look for the phone to go on preorder shortly after, with units shipping a week or two after the reveal. I’ll continue to update this story with fresh rumors, so come back for more.

Could like a cross between the Note 10 and Galaxy S10

The Galaxy S11 renders are out, and so are the concept designs, which I love because they can bring the rumors to life. 

So what might we get with Samsung’s S11 phone? Rounded shoulders, which have become the Galaxy S trademark, but with a more squared-off look reminiscent of the Galaxy Note 10. A slim body. Curved sides for all models, unlike the Galaxy S10E’s flat screen, which I actually really liked.

The camera array could become square, off to the left, and stick out from the surface, a lot like the iPhone 11 and Google Pixel 4. I really hope that’s not the case. Cameras that stick out are more vulnerable to breaking when you drop your phone. A case is an absolute must.

5G guaranteed, but there’s a catch

I mentioned 5G earlier. This is a rumored feature, but also a given. The Galaxy S11 is 99.9% likely to use the powerful Snapdragon 865 processor in it, which chipmaker Qualcomm won’t make available to phone brands without the 5G modem it pairs with. Ipso facto, you get a phone with the Snapdragon 865, you get a 5G-ready phone.

The same goes for any regions that will package the Galaxy S11 with Samsung’s in-house Exynos 990 5G processor, which often happens in Asia, especially Samsung’s home country of South Korea. (Ice Universe says Samsung is “determined” to use Snapdragon 865 for South Korean models.)

I promised a catch and here it is. While the Galaxy S11 will be 5G-ready, not every phone may be able to access 5G. Cities and countries that are 4G-only will only be able to use 4G networks, so the 5G Galaxy S11 could very well act like a 4G phone. 

We’ll see how it all shakes out, but I’d be surprised if Samsung used any chip other than Snapdragon 865. The Galaxy S series is its mainstream flagship and Samsung is the world’s largest phone-maker. It will want to put its best foot forward by delivering the phone with the “best” chip.

2019-12-19-15-47-442019-12-19-15-47-44

Another artistic rendition of the Galaxy S11.


Concept Creator

108-megapixel camera, periscope lens, 5X optical zoom

Now for the fun stuff, the camera. We already talked about how rumors, leaks and renders predict a square camera array overflowing with cameras. It gets wilder.

Samsung is said to be outfitting the Galaxy S11 (or at least one variant) with a 108-megapixel main camera sensor. Is that madness? It sounds like madness. But Chinese brand Xiaomi already beat Samsung to it with the Mi CC9 Pro, which already uses a 108-megapixel camera.

In addition, the Snapdragon 865 chip we talked about above can support a 200-megapixel camera. You may not be using all 108 pixels all the time, but having that extra resolution can be helpful for zooming in and cropping. If you like the sound of all that, thank the chipmaker for making it happen.

Here’s what else you could get with the S11 camera (at least on some models), according to Ice Universe and 91Mobiles:

galaxy-s11-Galaxy-S11Egalaxy-s11-Galaxy-S11E

Suggested renders for the Galaxy S11 and “S11E”.


Pricebaba

Screen: 120Hz AMOLED display

We talked about phone screens earlier, but here’s what else we’re likely to get: the ability to turn on a 120Hz screen refresh rate. That will make animations and scrolling a whole lot smoother than the standard 60Hz refresh rate wwe have now. 

While a 120Hz refresh rate is great for gaming and other quick transitions (even 90Hz like on the OnePlus 7T), it’s a battery hog. The Galaxy S11 could put the power in your hands with settings to switch between 60Hz to preserve battery life and 120Hz if you want to rev up animations.

This is pretty much a done deal since both the Snapdragon 865 and Exynos 990 5G support 210Hz screens.


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A whopping 5,000mAh battery?

Different size phones get different size batteries, and another rumor from the prolific Ice Universe dials in the Galaxy S11 “Plus” battery at 5,000mAh, which is ridonculous. 

Keep in mind that the “Plus” could also be the “Pro” (e.g., the highest-end model of the trio), which makes far more sense to me than the middle phone getting a battery that size. For reference, the Galaxy Note 10 Plus battery is 4,300mAh and battery life is outstanding.

There have been some phones with ultra-large batteries before, so 5,000mAh fits my expectations. For instance, the Asus ROG Phone II has a 6,000mAh battery, which makes it a gaming beast.

In-screen fingerprint reader

I loved the concept of an in-screen fingerprint reader, until I used it in the Galaxy S10. The accuracy, speed and convenience never quite lived up to the promise for me. 

My best-case scenario would be to the Galaxy S11 return to some form of secure face unlock, combined with the in-screen reader. Samsung already knows how to do this well. Remember, the series got iris scanning in the S7, but dropped it for the S10. Google has now done it better, with the Pixel 4’s gesture tracking lending a hand.

We could at least see a more robust form of in-screen biometric scanner, if Samsung decides to take advantage of the Snapdragon 865’s support for two-finger scanning, which is meant to improve the technology on all fronts. I sure hope it does.

screen-shot-2019-11-18-at-2-52-40-pmscreen-shot-2019-11-18-at-2-52-40-pm

In One UI 2, right, app folders open lower on the screen so that it’s easier for you to interact with them one-handed.


Samsung

Android 10 and Samsung One UI 2

There’s little doubt that every Samsung phone in 2020 will run on Android 10 and the company’s own One UI 2, which was announced in October and is now available in beta.

I’m much more excited about Android 10, which brings systemwide dark mode to phones, gesture navigation, some seriously impressive live captioning and new privacy settings. One UI 2 aims to push icons and screen controls toward the bottom of the phone so they’re easier to reach one-handed. 

Galaxy S11 series: Price will break $1,000

Now for the question on everyone’s mind: How much is the Galaxy S11 going to cost me? As always, it will depend on which model you buy. 

Let’s start with the Galaxy S10 prices for the base storage configuration:

  • Galaxy S10E: $749, £669, AU$1,199
  • Galaxy S10: $899, £799, AU$1,349
  • Galaxy S10 Plus: $999, £899, AU$1,499
  • Galaxy S10 5G: $1,300, £1,099, AU$2,950

5G costs the phone-makers more to buy and integrate, so we could see a price bump right off the bat. You’ll also spend more if you opt for a model with greater storage, say 512GB, assuming Samsung offers it and begins storage at 128GB.

If the largest version (“Pro” or “Plus”, depending on the remuros) lines up with the S10 Plus pricing, it’ll start at $1,000. With the 5G component and more camera tech, I wouldn’t be surprised to see that rise to $1,100, a price that matches the Galaxy Note 10 Plus today.

Originally published earlier this week.

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OnePlus 10T vs. Google Pixel 6: Should you spend $649 or $599? – Digital Trends

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In the market for the latest flagship? Comparing specs to choose the perfect phone can be a chore, and if you’re struggling to choose between the new OnePlus 10T and Google Pixel 6, we hear you. With its stunning 6.7-inch AMOLED 120Hz display, powerful Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1 chipset, and 4,800mAh battery with 125W SuperVOOC charging, the OnePlus 10T seems like a no-brainer. But what about the Google Pixel 6’s Tensor chip, wireless charging, and outstanding cameras?

We’ve compared the OnePlus 10T vs. Google Pixel 6 across six core categories to help you decide which to buy, so keep reading to figure out which is best for you.

Specs

OnePlus 10T Google Pixel 6
Size 163 x 75.37 x 8.75mm (6.42 x 2.97 x 0.34 inches) 158.6 x 74.8 x 8.9mm (6.24 x 2.94 x 0.35 inches)
Weight 203.5 grams (7.18 ounces) 207 grams (7.30 ounces)
Screen size 6.7-inch Fluid AMOLED with 60 to 120Hz adaptive refresh rate 6.4-inch OLED with 10 to 90Hz adaptive refresh rate
Screen resolution 2412 x 1080 (394 ppi) 2340 x 1080 pixels (411 ppi)
Operating system Android 12

OxygenOS 12.1

Android 12
Storage 128GB, 256GB 128GB, 256GB
MicroSD card slot No No
Tap-to-pay services Google Pay Google Pay
Processor Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1 Google Tensor
RAM 8GB, 16GB 8GB
Camera 50MP main, 8MP ultrawide, 2MP macro, 16MP front 50MP wide, 12MP ultrawide rear, 8MP front
Video

4K at 30 fps/60 fps

1080p at 30 fps/60 fps

4K at 30 fps/60 fps,

1080p at 30 fps/60 fps

Bluetooth version Bluetooth 5.3 Bluetooth 5.2
Ports USB-C USB-C
Fingerprint sensor Yes (in-display) Yes (in-display)
Water resistance IP54 IP68
Battery 4,800mAh

150W SuperVOOC charging (capped at 125W in the U.S.)

4,614mAh

30W wired charging

21W wireless charging

Reverse wireless charging

App marketplace Google Play Store Google Play Store
Colors Moonstone Black, Jade Green Stormy Black, Kinda Coral, Sorta Seaform
Prices Starting at $649 Starting at $599
Review score 3 out of 5 stars 4 out of 5 stars

Design, display, and durability

Joe Maring/Digital Trends

At a glance, these two phones have very different designs. The OnePlus 10T’s design has a clear resemblance to the stylish OnePlus 10 Pro, though the lack of an alert slider means it looks a lot more like an Oppo phone than other devices in the series. Weighing just 203.5 grams, it’s fairly light for its size compared to the heavier Pixel 6, which weighs in at 207 grams and is also slightly chunkier at 8.99mm thick, giving it a substantial feeling in your hand.

The OnePlus 10T has Gorilla Glass 5 on the back and covering the screen, but underneath is a plastic chassis — an odd choice for a phone at this price point. In contrast, the Pixel 6 looks a lot like the Pixel 6 Pro, boasting a glass and metal body with a Gorilla Glass 6 rear panel. Using both phones side-by-side, the Pixel 6 feels noticeably more premium — largely thanks to the aluminum frame compared to the 10T’s plastic one. Furthermore, the glass back on the Pixel 6 is also nicer. The OnePlus 10T’s back is glass, but it has a distinctly cheap feeling (especially on the black model).

The OnePlus 10T has a distinctive camera bump visible to the rear, notably missing the Hasselblad branding of recent OnePlus phones — and in this iteration, the selfie camera has relocated to the center of the screen. There’s an in-display fingerprint sensor, and the phone gets a rather paltry splashproof IP54 rating, while the Pixel 6 boasts a much more comprehensive IP68 rating.

Back of the Pixel 6.
Andy Boxall/Digital Trends

There are two colors to choose from with the OnePlus 10T. The first is the basalt-textured Moonstone Black, which is the one seen in most photos and shines differently depending on how the light hits it. You can also get Jade Green, which also looks nice but boasts a smooth, ceramic-like finish that doesn’t feel as premium as you might expect. Moonstone Black does a good job keeping fingerprints to a minimum, whereas Jade Green puts them on full display. When it comes to Pixel 6 color choices, Sorta Seafoam is a pretty minty green, Kinda Coral is, as its name suggests, an eye-catching (though muted) coral shade, while Stormy Black is, well, black.

Moving to the display, the OnePlus 10T’s 6.7-inch Fluid AMOLED FHD+ display boasts 2412 x 1080 (394 ppi) resolution, with an adaptive 60Hz-120Hz refresh rate. In comparison, the Google Pixel 6’s display measures just 6.4 inches with a 2340 x 1080 (411 ppi) resolution and has a 10-90Hz refresh rate. In practice, you shouldn’t notice much difference between the two phones’ refresh rates, but if you’re into your mobile games, the OnePlus 10T’s faster refresh rate may be a wiser choice — even though the lower adaptive refresh rate on the Pixel 6 may provide a better battery life boost. One other downside to the Pixel 6 is its overall brightness. If you spend a lot of time outside and need your screen to get as bright as possible, the 10T is the better choice.

This is one we have to give to the Google Pixel 6. It feels significantly nicer to hold than the 10T does, the distinct design looks great, and the more rugged IP protection is a big deal for anyone worried about getting their phone wet or near sand. The 10T might be a better choice if you really want a larger display with a 120Hz refresh rate, but overall, we think the Pixel 6 makes the better design decisions.

Winner: Google Pixel 6

Performance, battery life, and charging

There are several noticeable differences between the two phones when it comes to performance, battery life, and charging. The OnePlus 10T is powered by Qualcomm’s latest Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1 chip, which is actually a more powerful processor than that of the OnePlus 10 Pro (and more battery-friendly too). There’s also 8GB or 16GB of RAM on offer, though 16GB feels a bit like overkill. The focus here is on horsepower — in fact, the OnePlus 10T feels like a gaming phone in terms of performance.

In contrast, the Pixel 6 packs Google’s Tensor chip, the same processor as the Pixel 6 Pro. This chip has an eight-core CPU and prioritizes efficiency with lightning-fast performance. You “only” get 8GB of RAM here, but that’s more than enough.

When it comes to storage, the two phones are identical, both offering 128GB or 256GB variants with no microSD card slot. Bear in mind this means the storage you choose is all you’ll ever have, so if you’re the type who never deletes anything, opt for the 256GB model on either phone.

How about battery life? The OnePlus 10T packs a beefy 4,800mAh battery with up to 150W SuperVOOC charging. Note that speeds top out at 125W in the U.S., as most outlets don’t offer enough power for 150W speeds, though traveling with your U.S.-bought phone will get you 150W charging elsewhere. Whether you’re charging at 150W or 125W, expect to go from 0% to 100% battery in around 20 minutes. In practice, it’s very impressive.

In contrast, the Pixel 6 has a slightly smaller 4,614mAh battery that should still see you through a day of average use with some left in the tank. We found that we were left with around 60% battery after three hours of screen-on time. There’s only 30W charging on offer here, but you do get 21W wireless charging and reverse wireless charging as a nice bonus. Sadly, there’s no charger in the box.

We’re giving this round to the OnePlus 10T, though it’s very close. With its Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1 chip, extra RAM, beefy battery, and 125W fast charging, it just pips the Pixel 6 to the crown — even though there’s no wireless charging. If you can’t live without wireless charging and you don’t mind a slightly smaller battery and slower charging speeds, the Pixel 6 might be the better choice for you.

Winner: OnePlus 10T

Camera

Pixel 6 camera module.
Andy Boxall/Digital Trends

The differences between these two phones are perhaps most noticeable when it comes to cameras. The OnePlus 10T packs a triple-camera array on the rear, with a 50MP main lens, 8MP ultrawide, and 2MP macro shooter. There’s also a 16MP front camera. Unlike the OnePlus 10 Pro, there are no Hasselblad-tuned cameras on the 10T. The main camera takes perfectly good shots (though struggles a bit indoors and in low light), but the end results don’t look quite as good as the OnePlus 10 Pro. Likewise, the 8MP ultrawide delivers just fine photos, while the 2MP macro camera is really just there for looks. There’s Super HDR for high-contrast shots, and Nightscape 2.0 for improved night-time captures, too.

In contrast, the Google Pixel 6 packs the same 50MP main and 12MP wide-angle cameras as the Pixel 6 Pro, plus an 8MP selfie cam. The main camera delivers excellent results, with Action Pan and Long Exposure camera modes, plus the option to use Magic Eraser in Google Photos. Google’s digital zoom is decent and lets you shoot at up to 7x, while the selfie cam also delivers good results. The Pixel 6’s cameras capture great photos effortlessly in any light, at any time of day — something we can’t really say about the OnePlus 10T.

What about video? With the OnePlus 10T, you can capture 4K video at 30/60 frames per second (fps) and 1080p at 30/60 fps. The Pixel 6 is capable of those same modes, and it also comes with slo-mo video at 240fps.

Does the OnePlus 10T have the worst camera system we’ve ever used? Not at all. But when compared side-by-side with the Pixel 6, there’s no question about which one we’d recommend to shutterbugs. The Pixel 6 easily takes this round.

Winner: Google Pixel 6

Software and updates

Pixel 6 screen.
Andy Boxall/Digital Trends

Both the 10T and Pixel 6 ship with Android 12, though their approach to the software is very different. Android 12 on the OnePlus 10T is heavily customized with OxygenOS 12.1. While OxygenOS used to be hailed as one of the best third-party Android interfaces available, it’s devolved into a lesser state with the current 12.1 version. From missed notifications, inconsistent touch responsiveness, and heavy inspiration from ColorOS for the aesthetics, it’s a shell of what OxygenOS used to be.

The Pixel 6, on the other hand, has one of the best Android experiences available today. It’s fast, uncluttered, and filled with helpful features. Want your phone to automatically detect and show you what song is playing in the background? The Pixel 6 can do that. Want the Google Assistant to hold your spot in line during phone calls? It does that, too.

OnePlus has promised a solid three years of updates and four years of security patches for the OnePlus 10T. While great, this is still some way behind Google and Samsung’s promises of up to five years of security updates. The Pixel 6 gets three years of OS updates and five years of security patches.

With its better take on Android 12 and longer software support, this is another win that goes to the Pixel 6.

Winner: Google Pixel 6

Special features

Both phones have their own takes on special features. Both have 5G, although the OnePlus 10T only supports sub-6GHz 5G, not mmWave. The Pixel 6 supports both sub-6 and mmWave 5G in the U.S., though handsets sold in the U.K. only support sub-6 5G. It’s worth noting here that the Pixel 6 has been plagued with connectivity issues and switching between 4G, 5G, and Wi-Fi can be glitchy, with even a restart sometimes failing to solve the problem.

The OnePlus 10T and Pixel 6 each pack an in-display fingerprint sensor, but the 10T’s is noticeably better. It’s fast, reliable, and works when you want it to. Comparatively, the Pixel 6’s fingerprint sensor has become notorious for being slow and unresponsive.

Neither phone has a microSD card slow, so the storage you get is all you’ll ever have. There’s also no 3.5mm headphone jack on offer across either phone, but that’s pretty standard.

This round’s really too close to call. If you’re in the U.S. and need mmWave 5G, the Pixel 6 may be the best choice for you, but otherwise, neither phone has any special features that make it stand out.

Winner: Tie

Price and availability

The OnePlus 10T is launching with a starting price of $649 in the U.S. for the 8GB/128GB version. In the U.S., the phone is available to pre-order on September 1 from the OnePlus Store, Amazon, or Best Buy, and on sale on September 29. The Google Pixel 6 is available right now from the Google store, starting from $599 for the 128GB version. You can also buy it from other retailers such as Amazon or Best Buy.

Overall winner: Google Pixel 6

If we’re making a broad recommendation about which phone to get, our pick is the Google Pixel 6. It has a nicer design than the 10T, better waterproofing, much more reliable cameras, wireless charging, more enjoyable software, and is even $50 cheaper than the OnePlus 10T. Google Tensor isn’t the fastest chipset, and the 90Hz display isn’t the best we’ve ever seen, but they’re still perfectly enjoyable and reliable throughout daily use.

So, who’s the OnePlus 10T for? If you absolutely need the fastest chipset available and are OK sacrificing a few other features for ultra-fast wired charging, the 10T delivers on its performance promises. But in the quest to achieve breakneck performance, it ends up sacrificing a few important things along the way. It’s certainly not a bad smartphone, but we think most people are better off with Google’s handset.

Editors’ Recommendations




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What do you want to see at Samsung's August Unpacked event – MobileSyrup

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Samsung’s upcoming August 10th Unpacked event is quickly approaching, with devices like the Galaxy Fold 4, Galaxy Flip 4, Galaxy Watch 5 and the Galaxy Buds 2 Pro on the way.

This week’s Community Question is: what are you most excited to see at the keynote?

I’m a big fan of foldables and especially the Galaxy Fold lineup, so naturally, I’m excited to see the Fold 4. This year’s handset will reportedly sport an improved camera setup, which was one of the Fold 3’s only downsides. Additionally, we expect up to 16GB of RAM, a Qualcomm Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 chip and an improved under-display camera.

[embedded content]

I’m also hoping to see a tease of something entirely new. A previous rumour indicated that Samsung will show off another mysterious foldable at this Unpacked event. That doesn’t seem like the case anymore based on recent rumours, but there’s still a possibility we might catch a glimpse of an entirely new device.

Either way, we’ll need to wait until August 10th to see what’s coming. For more on Samsung’s foldable-focused Unpacked, check out my story that outlines everything I expect to see at the event.

Let us know in the comments below what you are most excited to see at Samsung’s upcoming Unpacked.

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OnePlus 10T goes on sale in India – GSMArena.com news – GSMArena.com

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The OnePlus 10T unveiled a few days ago is now available for purchase in India through Amazon.in and OnePlus’s official Indian website. It comes in Moonstone Black and Jade Green colors with two memory options – 8GB/128GB and 12G/256GB, priced at INR49,999 ($630/€620) and INR54,999 ($690/€680), respectively. There’s also a variant with 16GB RAM and 256GB storage onboard, but that’s not available in India.

The OnePlus 10T is powered by the Snapdragon 8+ Gen 1 SoC and runs Android 12-based OxygenOS 12 out of the box. It’s built around a 6.7″ 120Hz FullHD+ AMOLED screen with a fingerprint reader underneath for biometric authentication and a punch hole for the 16MP selfie camera.

Around the back, we have a 50MP primary camera, joined by 8MP ultrawide and 2MP macro units.


OnePlus 10T

OnePlus 10T

The OnePlus 10T packs a 4,800 mAh battery with 150W wired charging, but it can only go up to 125W in North America.

The rest of the OnePlus 10T’s highlights include 5G connectivity, USB-C, stereo speakers, and NFC. You can read our OnePlus 10T hands-on review here to learn more about it.

Also, while the OnePlus 10T is already available for purchase in India, the smartphone is still on pre-orders in Europe, with shipments beginning on August 25. Pre-bookings in the US begin on September 1, and the device will start shipping on September 29.

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