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Galaxy S21 Plus and Ultra vs. S20 Plus and Ultra: Samsung's premium S phones compared – CNET

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Drew Evans/CNET

Samsung’s trio of phones that make up its flagship Galaxy S21 lineup have arrived — and the higher-end S21 Plus and S21 Ultra come packed with all the trappings you’d expect from a premium Android phone. All three are available to purchase now. If you’re in the market for something fancier than the base model, it’s probably a good time to take a closer look at how Samsung’s pro phones, the S21 Plus and the S21 Ultra, compare with each other, and how they differ from their predecessors.

The standout change to the S21 is the price tag. Following lackluster sales of the S20 family, the South Korean company slashed prices by $200 across the S21 line, with the S21 Plus and S21 Ultra starting at $1,000 (£949, AU$ 1,549) and $1,200 (£1,329, AU$1,849) respectively.

The S21 Plus and S21 Ultra also have the expected incremental upgrades working in their favor: Processors are speedier, the displays have been upgraded and the cameras have been improved to take crisper photos and videos. The S21 Ultra now also supports Samsung’s stylus, the S Pen (sold separately), which blurs the line between the S series and the more professional Note series. 

Read more: The best phone to buy for 2021


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Samsung has also packed some refinements into the S21 Ultra’s camera system, but it hasn’t updated headline features such as 8K resolution and the phone’s 108-megapixel shooter. If you’re an avid photographer, you’ll likely care that the S21 Ultra comes equipped with two telephoto lenses (as opposed to one in the S20 Ultra) that offer 3x and 10x optical zoom, instead of digital zoom. Plus the main image sensor is apparently larger, which will allow it to capture photographs with improved dynamic range.

It’s also important to highlight the features Samsung removed to allow it to start at those lower prices. Because Samsung slashed prices of all three of S21 phones, it needed to save on costs by eliminating expandable storage entirely and ditching the in-box charger and earphones. The pricier S20 Plus and Ultra meanwhile, let you add up to 1TB storage and include those bundled accessories.

For more details on the differences between the S21 Ultra, S21 Plus, S20 Ultra and S20 Plus, take a look at our specs chart below.

Galaxy S21 Pro vs. S21 Ultra vs. S20 Pro vs. S20 Ultra

Galaxy S21 Plus Galaxy S21 Ultra Samsung Galaxy S20 Plus Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra
Display size, resolution 6.7-inch Flat FHD+ Dynamic AMOLED 2X (2,400×1,080 pixels) 6.8-inch Edge WQHD+ Dynamic AMOLED 2X (3,200×1,440 pixels), 6.7-inch Dynamic AMOLED 2X 6.9-inch Dynamic AMOLED 2X
Pixel density 394 ppi 515 ppi 525ppi 511ppi
Dimensions (Inches) 2.97×6.35×0.30 in 2.97×6.50×0.35 in 2.9×6.37×0.30 in 2.99×6.57×0.35 in
Dimensions (Millimeters) 75.6×161.5×7.8 mm 75.6×165.1×8.9 mm 73.7×161.9×7.8 mm 76.0×166.9×8.8 mm
Weight (Ounces, Grams) 7.12 oz; 202g 8.07 oz; 229 g 6.56 oz; 186g 7.76 oz; 220g
Mobile software Android 11 Android 11 Android 10 Android 10
Camera 64-megapixel (telephoto), 12-megapixel (wide-angle), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide) 108-megapixel (wide-angle), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide), 10-megapixel (telephoto), 10-megapixel (telephoto) 12-megapixel (wide-angle), 64-megapixel (telephoto), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide), time-of-flight camera 108-megapixel (wide-angle), 48-megapixel (telephoto), 12-megapixel (ultra-wide), time-of-flight camera
Front-facing camera 10-megapixel 40-megapixel 10-megapixel 40-megapixel
Video capture 8K 8K 8K 8K
Processor Snapdragon 888 or 64-bit Octa-Core Processor 2.8GHz (Max 2.4GHz +1.8GHz) Snapdragon 888 or 64-bit Octa-Core Processor 2.8GHz (Max 2.4GHz +1.8GHz) 64-bit octa-core processor (Max 2.7GHz + 2.5 GHz + 2.0 GHz) 64-bit octa-core processor (Max 2.7GHz + 2.5 GHz + 2.0 GHz)
Storage 128GB/256GB 128GB/256GB, 512GB 128GB, 512GB 128GB, 512GB
RAM 8GB 12GB, 16GB 12GB (5G), 8GB (LTE) 12GB, 16GB
Expandable storage None None Up to 1TB Up to 1TB
Battery 4,800 mAh 5,000 mAh 4,500 mAh 5,000 mAh
Fingerprint sensor In-screen In-screen In-screen In-screen
Headphone jack No No No No
Special features IP68 rating, 5G-enabled, 30X Space Zoom, 10W wireless charging, IP68 rating, 5G-enabled, 100X Space Zoom, 10W wireless charging, 10x optical zoom 5G enabled; 120Hz refresh rate; water resistant (IP68) 5G enabled; 120Hz refresh rate; 100X zoom; water resistant (IP68)
Price off-contract (USD) $1,000 (128 GB)  $1,200 (128 GB)  $1,199 (128 GB) , $1,349 (512GB) $1,399 (128GB), $1,599 (512GB)
Price (GBP) £949 £1,329 £999 (5G) £1,199 (128GB), £1,399 (512GB)
Price (AUD) AU$1,549 AU$1,849 AU$1,499 (4G), AU$1,649 (128GB), AU$1,899 (512GB) AU$1,999 (128GB), AU$2,249 (512GB)

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Apple Faces UK Antitrust Investigation Into App Store – BNN

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U.K. antitrust authorities opened a probe into Apple Inc’s app payment rules, adding to a slew of global probes examining the control the iPhone maker holds over app developers.

The Competition and Markets Authority said it will focus on how Apple forces customers to use its own payment system for in-app purchases and will weigh the company’s potentially “dominant” position in the supply of apps on iPhones and iPads.

“Complaints that Apple is using its market position to set terms which are unfair or may restrict competition and choice -– potentially causing customers to lose out when buying and using apps -– warrant careful scrutiny,” said Andrea Coscelli, who leads the CMA.

The probe adds to growing U.S. and EU antitrust scrutiny of Apple’s rules that require apps to use its own in-app payment system. Apple’s control of payments allows it to enforce a subscription fee of up to 30 per cent for some subscription fees. The Dutch competition authority is also examining whether users get a free choice of payments on phones that restrict rival contactless payment, such as Apple phones.

The investigation was partially prompted by concerns from developers, the CMA said. Epic Games Inc., the maker of the Fortnite battle game, is suing Apple in the U.S. and Australia over the issue and recently lost an attempt to pursue legal action against the Apple app stores at the U.K.’s antitrust tribunal.

The Apple probe comes as the U.K. watchdog seeks to move to the forefront of tech regulation after emerging from the shadow of European Union regulators at the end of Britain’s Brexit transition. It is preparing to set up a tech-focused unit and has warned that the largest companies will face extra scrutiny of everything from mergers to monopoly behavior.

Apple said in a statement that it looks forward to working with the CMA to “to explain how our guidelines for privacy, security and content have made the App Store a trusted marketplace for both consumers and developers.”

The investigation “shows the impact of Brexit,” said Damien Geradin, a lawyer representing some of the developers that filed complaints. “It gives a lot of freedom to the CMA, which now doesn’t need authorization” from the EU, he said.

Geradin said that while the CMA probe was likely to focus on in-app purchases, the regulators may broaden the scope to consider issues such as why Apple only allows one app store on its devices.

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‘RIP SN10’: SpaceX rocket goes up in flames after landing – Al Jazeera English

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Starship rocket SN10 blows up eight minutes after appearing to nail landing, the third prototype to be destroyed.

The third time appeared to be the charm for Elon Musk’s Starship prototype rocket, until it wasn’t.

The rocket soared into the sky in a high-altitude test on Wednesday from Boca Chica in Texas, then flew itself back to Earth and manoeuvred into its first – successful – upright landing.

But the triumph was short-lived.

“A beautiful soft landing,” a SpaceX commentator said during a live broadcast of the test flight, as an automated fire-suppression system trained a stream of water on flames still burning at the base of the rocket.

About eight minutes later it blew itself to pieces, lurching into the air and crashing back to the ground.

There was no immediate explanation for what went wrong.

SN10 was the third Starship to be destroyed in a fireball although it came far closer to achieving a safe, vertical touchdown than two previous models – SN8 in December and SN9 in February. The rocket is being developed by SpaceX to carry people and cargo on future missions to the Moon and Mars.

For Elon Musk, the billionaire SpaceX founder who also heads the electric carmaker, Tesla, the outcome was mixed news.

This screengrab made from SpaceX’s live webcast shows the Starship SN10 prototype as it prepares to land during the second attempted test flight of the day [Jose Romero/SpaceX via AFP]

In a tweet responding to tempered congratulations from an admirer of his work, Musk replied, “RIP SN10, honorable discharge.”

The video feed provided by SpaceX on the company’s YouTube channel cut off moments after the landing. But separate fan feeds streamed over the same social media platform showed an explosion suddenly erupting at the base of the rocket, hurling the SN10 into the air before it crashed to the ground and became engulfed in flames.

The complete Starship rocket, which will stand 394-feet (120 metres) tall when connected with its super-heavy first-stage booster, is SpaceX’s next-generation fully reusable launch vehicle – the centre of Musk’s ambitions to make human space travel more affordable and routine.

The first orbital Starship flight is planned for year’s end.

On Wednesday, Japanese billionaire and online fashion tycoon Yusaku Maezawa, who paid an undisclosed sum for a SpaceX lunar spaceship trip, invited eight people from around the world to join him.

The Starship tests take place in a nearly deserted area leased by SpaceX in southern Texas near the border with Mexico and the Gulf of Mexico.

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Google Chrome: It's time to ditch the browser – ZDNet

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Google Chrome is the most-used browser on the internet. The browser rose to fame as an alternative to slow, sluggish incumbents — Internet Explorer and Safari. But Google Chrome has become the new leader, and as a result has itself become the sluggish incumbent.  

It became the thing we hated. We created a monster.

It’s time for a change.

Also: Actively exploited Chrome browser zero-day vulnerability patched

I don’t say this lightly.

Over the past few months, I’ve been testing browsers, examining things like performance, memory usage, battery usage, and overall feel of using the browser.

I know that picking the “best” browser is a personal and potentially controversial thing. It’s a bit like asking whose Mom makes the best apple pie (mine, of course), or whether it’s cats or dogs that rule (cats, because dogs are just a rubbish, attention-seeking kind of cat).

The answers are personal. Specific to the individual use case.

But, with that said, I can still come up with a number of good reasons to dump Chrome.

Power usage

If your device is powered by a battery, then you’re best using the stock browser.

On Windows, that is Edge, and on Mac and iOS that’s Safari. Both have been highly tuned to the platform they are running on and offer the best battery life and thermal performance possible.

Yes, you can tweak and fiddle with Chrome to make things better, but better is still far from best.

Also: Google is really annoyed you’re using Microsoft Edge

When I switched from Chrome to Safari on my daily driver MacBook Pro, I was getting over an hour of extra battery life, which is a very significant gain.

Switching to Safari on the iPhone also got me significantly better battery life, but it’s harder to measure since the browser isn’t the main focus of my day on that platform.

For the best possible battery and power performance, use the stock browser.

Period.

Operating system optimizations

One of the great “selling” points of Google Chrome is that you get a streamlined, consistent experience across all the platforms you are using.

That’s nice for sure, but after using Edge and Safari on their respective platforms for a few weeks, I was surprised to find how clunky that experience actually is, compared to the stock browser.

It’s hard to put it into words, but Safari on Mac or Edge on Windows feel like an extension of the operating system. It’s a smoother transition between the OS and the browser. Coming back to Chrome suddenly felt clumsy (and this is when I also noticed the sluggish performance the most).

Having a choice

Google Chrome is a great tool for Google to slurp up a lot of data, both to find out how people use the internet and also things like passwords and payment details to keep us locked into the ecosystem.

While I’m not paranoid about my data, I’m a fan of having a choice over where my data is stored and how it’s used, and what companies I choose to work with, and being able to pick and choose what works best for me, not what is convenient.

The big exception

And that is Android. Here Google Chrome is the winner. I’ve played with other browsers on this platform, but Chrome is the one that works best. It is, after all, the stock browser, and as such as been tweaked to give the best performance.

What browser do you use? Why do you use it? When was the last time you tried a different browser?

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