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Pedro Pascal visits fan’s art show dedicated to him in Margate – The Guardian

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The internet’s favourite TV actor, Pedro Pascal, best known for his roles in The Last of Us and The Mandalorian, turned up at a fan’s art show that was all about him last weekend.

The Margate exhibition, called ADHD Hyper Fixation and why it looks like I love Pedro Pascal, was created by the artist Heidi Gentle Burrell, 45, in June. Pascal visited with his friend and fellow actor Russell Tovey, and the gallerist and former musician Robert Diament.

However, when they arrived, the gallery was shut for the day. They took a selfie outside the window to mark the occasion, which Tovey shared on social media, captioning it: “Margate art friends reunited”.

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Burrell, who sadly wasn’t in Margate at the same time as Pascal, told the Independent that she used art as a means of expressing her “self-diagnosed” ADHD.

She said Pascal had a “really interesting face”, which featured “two little bald patches in his beard and creases in his eyebrows and bridge of his nose”.

“I wouldn’t call myself an obsessed fan,” she added, “but I do hyper-fixate on capturing him in my art.”

The Rhodes Gallery, where the exhibition is still on display, also shared the photo, describing the “wonderful and amazing” moment as “the ultimate event”.

The 48-year-old actor, who also starred in Game of Thrones, has proven to be a hit with pop culture fans.

This year, Pascal told the Hollywood Reporter that, because of the way his GoT character, Oberyn Martell, had died, fans were “super into taking selfies with their thumbs in my eyes”.

“I was so earnest and happy about the success of the character in the show, I’d let them!” he said. “And then I remember getting a bit of an eye infection.”

He also regularly goes viral on TikTok for his sweet red carpet and junket interviews, which have earned him a “daddy of the internet” reputation and made him the “internet’s resident crush”.

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In apparent first, Croatia restores looted art to grandson of Holocaust victim

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In the first reported case of its kind in Croatia, three museums have restored several pieces of art stolen from a Jewish businessman during the Holocaust to his grandson, according to a report Friday.

The move marks the end of a 70-year struggle by the descendants of Dane Reichsmann, who was a wealthy owner of a department store in the country’s capital Zagreb before the Nazi-led genocide and was deported and murdered at Auschwitz along with his wife.

“This seems almost beyond belief,” Andy Reichsman, Dane’s grandson, and inheritor of the looted works told The New York Times. “I thought that our chances would be one in a million. They never had any interest in giving anything back to Jews.”

The artworks returned include paintings by André Derain, “Still Life With a Bottle,” and Maurice de Vlaminick’s “Landscape by the Water,” which were held by the National Museum of Modern Art, and lithographs from the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts by Pablo Picasso, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Cézanne and Pierre Bonnard.

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A bronze plaque, copper tray, and bowl from the Zagreb Museum of Arts and Crafts was also restored. However, 19 additional pieces from the institution are still being pursued by Reichsman’s lawyer.

The pieces were looted by the ruling Croatian fascist group, the Ustaše.

André Derain’s “Still Life With a Bottle,” an art piece looted by the Nazi-allied regime in Croatia during the Holocaust and restored in September 2023 to its rightful owner, undated. (Archives of the Zagreb National Museum of Modern Art)

Reichsman’s aunt Danica Scodoba and father Franz Reichsman fled Europe before the outbreak of World War II to London and the United States, respectively (Franz dropped the extra N from his family name “Reichsmann” when he immigrated).

Reichsman took up the struggle of his aunt, who tried for half a century to reclaim the property. He recalled that “she traveled to Zagreb every summer and met with gallery directors, government officials and anyone she felt could help her in her attempts to retrieve the art.”

Scodoba died more than two decades ago and was unable to witness a Zagreb Municipal Court ruling in December 2020 that determined the pieces legally belonged to her.

A subsequent decision in 2021 affirmed her nephew as her heir.

Reichsman’s Croatian laywer, Monja Matic, said she valued her client’s patience after she had worked on the case for some 20 years.

“This is a positive step in dealing with outstanding Holocaust Era restitution issues in Croatia,” said Gideon Taylor, President of the World Jewish Restitution Organization.

The National Museum of Modern Art said in a Facebook statement it was “working intensively on researching provenance” of artworks suspected of being looted during the war.

The institution regretted that the resolution took as long as it did.

Croatia rebuffed restitution claims by descendants of Holocaust victims until last year when its government and the World Jewish Restitution Organization published a joint report detailing the looting of art by the fascist regime. Stolen property was subsequently seized and nationalized by the country’s communist government.

The Nazi-allied Ustaše regime, which ran the Independent State of Croatia from 1941 to 1945, persecuted and killed hundreds of thousands of ethnic Serbs, Jews, Roma and anti-fascist Croatians.

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Can David Salle Teach A.I. How to Create Good Art?

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The totem pole previously displayed at the Orillia Opera House has officially and permanently been removed from the city’s public art collection.

Created by artists Jimi McKee and Wayne Hill more than 20 years ago, the formerly prominently displayed work tells the story of Orillia from the days of the ancient fishing weirs at The Narrows through the present, in the fashion of totem poles created by west coast Indigenous communities.

JimiMcKee
Jimi McKee, a local artist, is shown in this file photo.

Last summer, after the piece developed deep cracks and structural instability, the city received two public complaints regarding the structural issues and its “insensitivity” to west coast Indigenous communities.

Council voted to remove it from the Opera House for health and safety reasons, and to undertake consultation with relevant Indigenous groups regarding potential repairs or updates to the work.

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In Friday’s council information package, city staff announced the piece would be permanently removed from the city’s public art collection after consultation with McKee and experts from the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia (UBC).

“The subject experts from the Museum of Anthropology at UBC support deaccessioning the piece from the city’s collection due to concerns surrounding cultural appropriation and misrepresentation of Indigenous cultures from the West,” staff wrote.

City staff said they support UBC and the city’s art in public places committee (APPC) recommendation to remove the totem pole to help ensure the city’s public spaces are “welcoming and inclusive.”

“Given the feedback from subject experts at UBC, the sacred nature of the totem pole, and the health and safety concerns identified by the joint health and safety committee, staff support the APPC’s recommendation to remove the artwork from the (Opera House) and deaccession the art from the city’s permanent collection,” staff wrote.

“As understanding of Indigenous culture grows, this step looks to ensure the municipality’s public spaces are welcoming and inclusive places for our Indigenous peoples who visit and call Orillia home.”

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Opera House totem pole permanently removed from city’s art collection

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The totem pole previously displayed at the Orillia Opera House has officially and permanently been removed from the city’s public art collection.

Created by artists Jimi McKee and Wayne Hill more than 20 years ago, the formerly prominently displayed work tells the story of Orillia from the days of the ancient fishing weirs at The Narrows through the present, in the fashion of totem poles created by west coast Indigenous communities.

JimiMcKee
Jimi McKee, a local artist, is shown in this file photo.

Last summer, after the piece developed deep cracks and structural instability, the city received two public complaints regarding the structural issues and its “insensitivity” to west coast Indigenous communities.

Council voted to remove it from the Opera House for health and safety reasons, and to undertake consultation with relevant Indigenous groups regarding potential repairs or updates to the work.

300x250x1

In Friday’s council information package, city staff announced the piece would be permanently removed from the city’s public art collection after consultation with McKee and experts from the Museum of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia (UBC).

“The subject experts from the Museum of Anthropology at UBC support deaccessioning the piece from the city’s collection due to concerns surrounding cultural appropriation and misrepresentation of Indigenous cultures from the West,” staff wrote.

City staff said they support UBC and the city’s art in public places committee (APPC) recommendation to remove the totem pole to help ensure the city’s public spaces are “welcoming and inclusive.”

“Given the feedback from subject experts at UBC, the sacred nature of the totem pole, and the health and safety concerns identified by the joint health and safety committee, staff support the APPC’s recommendation to remove the artwork from the (Opera House) and deaccession the art from the city’s permanent collection,” staff wrote.

“As understanding of Indigenous culture grows, this step looks to ensure the municipality’s public spaces are welcoming and inclusive places for our Indigenous peoples who visit and call Orillia home.”

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