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Report: NASA needs more time, money to bring back Mars rocks – Toronto Star

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA is underestimating the amount of time and money it will take to bring Mars rocks back to Earth in the coming decade, an independent panel said Tuesday.

The review board suggested that NASA and the European Space Agency consider bumping the next launches in the sample-return effort from 2026 to 2028, given all the technological challenges. These delays will increase costs, pushing the planning budget to $4 billion or more — $1 billion more than currently envisioned by NASA, the panel noted.

Already more than halfway to Mars, NASA’s Perseverance rover will hunt for the best geologic samples, after landing in February. It’s aiming for Jezero Crater, believed to be an ancient river delta that may have once harboured microscopic life.

Scientists want to analyze these samples in the best labs on Earth, in hopes of ascertaining whether life ever existed in the planet’s lush, wet past. The goal is to get the samples back in the early 2030s.

In order to do that, the space agencies have teamed up to develop a lander to fetch the samples, a rocket to get them off the Martian surface and an orbiting spacecraft to accept them and return them to Earth. All this gear will require two separate launches from Earth.

The chairman of the review board, David Thompson, retired chief executive of Orbital ATK, told reporters a two-year launch delay is advisable for the best chances of success. At the same time, however, no one is suggesting that NASA slow down, stressed panel member Maria Zuber of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

NASA’s science mission chief, Thomas Zurbuchen, said the space agency will reassess the mission dates and consider all options. But for now, “it’s full steam ahead … we’re not taking a break in any fashion.”

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The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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China's lunar probe Chang'e-5 enters lunar orbit after perilune braking – CGTN

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00:53

China’s Chang’e-5 probe decelerated and entered lunar orbit on Saturday, completing a vital step on its way to collect and return moon samples, the China National Space Administration (CNSA) announced.

The probe performed the braking at perilune without incident and entered the lunar orbit successfully, according to real-time monitoring data. Braking at perilune is a critical maneuver, as the probe, traveling at a high speed, needs to carry out braking to lower its relative velocity, to enable it to be captured by lunar gravity.

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This is how you can really help reduce greenhouse gas emissions – CTV News

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TORONTO —
When many Canadians think of how they can help lower greenhouse gas emissions, they often look for ways to reduce their own carbon footprint by flying less frequently or driving an electric vehicle, for example.

However, as laudable as those actions may be, climate activists say there are more effective ways for people to become involved and make a difference.

Alex Speers-Roesch, a climate campaigner with Greenpeace Canada, explained that the phrase “carbon footprint,” which is the measure of the total greenhouse gas emissions directly or indirectly caused by an individual, organization, event, or product, was actually popularized by the multinational oil and gas company BP in the early 2000s in an attempt to put the burden of change on to the individual.  

“It’s good for people to think about the emissions associated with the things that they consume, but there’s a tendency sometimes in the way that carbon footprints are talked about and promoted that tries to put the onus on individuals and consumers for those emissions in a way that can be unfair,” he told CTVNews.ca during a telephone interview in late November.

Lauren Latour, a climate ambition co-ordinator for Climate Action Network Canada, cited a study from a few years ago that showed that just 100 companies were responsible for 70 per cent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions since 1988.

She also referenced another recent study that claimed frequent-flying “super emitters,” consisting of just 1 per cent of the population, were responsible for half of the world’s aviation carbon emissions in 2018.

“The average Canadian is very much not responsible for the lion’s share of harmful climate change effects,” Latour said during an interview with CTVNews.ca in late November.

So while both Latour and Speers-Roesch said Canadians should be mindful of the greenhouse gas emissions associated with the goods and services they consume and how their individual choices affect the environment, they said there are other, more impactful, ways for them to address the climate emergency.

“It’s not going to be the individual actions of consumers that are going to address the climate crisis, what we really need is collective action from all of us working together to produce systemic change,” Speers-Roesch said.

SEEK INFORMATION

Canadians interested in doing their part to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions can start by seeking out more information about the topic from environmental organizations dedicated to the cause, Speers-Roesch suggested.

He said there are many climate change groups operating in Canada, such as Greenpeace Canada, 350 Canada, Environmental Defence, and Climate Action Network Canada.

“Find a group like that, sign up for the email list, see if you can get involved,” he said. “Once you start looking, though, you start to see, ‘Oh there are opportunities everywhere.’”

Speers-Roesch said Canadians can also seek out climate change events happening in their area. For example, if there is a protest nearby, he suggested going to see what it’s about and to meet other attendees.

“As you connect with others and get more involved and get more engaged, you’ll probably have more ideas,” he said. “Before you know it, you’ll have lots of stuff to keep you busy on climate change.”

BECOME POLITICALLY ENGAGED

Latour acknowledged that getting involved in politics can be a “scary” thing for a lot of people, but that it doesn’t have to be and there are many opportunities to become engaged by joining community-led initiatives.

She said Canadians can join local organizations that work to influence government policy on the municipal level.

“For instance, a city is able to switch its bus fleet over from fuel combustion buses to low emissions, or hybrid or electric buses, or an electric light rail system,” she said.

Latour said Canadians can also volunteer for a mutual aid effort that is dedicated to building resiliency in their town or region. For example, she cited the groups that stepped up to help mitigate the effects of flooding in the Ottawa area over the past few years.

“In a lot of places, we see municipalities and we see smaller communities really leading the way on climate change and on climate policy,” she said.

“Individual change does matter and that individual change is getting involved in community organizing and getting involved in influencing your politics and local legislation.”

Speers-Roesch, too, said political activism is one of the most important things Canadians can do to become involved in the fight against climate change.

“The majority of the emissions are due to industry and are a result of government policy decisions so that’s really the most important and impactful place that people can focus their energies,” he said.

The Greenpeace campaigner said that Canadians should learn about their local politicians’ environmental platforms and encourage them to act.

“Call your MP, call your MPP, or city councillor,” he said. “Let them know you want them to do more on climate change.”

PUSH THE CONVERSATION FORWARD

Finally, Speers-Roesch said Canadians can still do their part by incorporating climate change issues and pushing the conversation forward in their daily lives.

“Think about how you can bring climate activism into your existing life,” he said. “It doesn’t always necessarily have to be finding another group and joining them.”

As an example, Speers-Roesch said someone who is already part of a book club that meets on a weekly basis could suggest a book for them to read on climate change.

He said they could also organize an event within an organization they’re already involved in, such as their workplace, school, sports team, church, or temple, to raise more awareness.

“Look for a little thing that you can do each week to sort of make your voice heard and get activated and engaged on climate change,” Speers-Roesch advised. “Climate change is something that we really need to sort of infuse into every aspect of our lives and our work and everything that we do.” 

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Victoria home-composting system makes Time's top 100 inventions – Times Colonist

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Victor Nicolov got an early Christmas present last week, when Time magazine named the Sepura home-composting system one of its 100 inventions of the year.

Nicolov, chief executive of ­Victoria-based Anvy Technologies, had his eye on the bigger prize of sending out the first shipment of his Sepura system early in the new year, but said being named to the list was exciting.

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“This means there will be more people finding out there is another solution for getting rid of waste at home,” he said.

The Sepura system, which Nicolov started developing in 2018, is a smart device that attaches to a kitchen sink and acts as a filter between the drain and the drain pipe.

The system extracts all the liquid from food waste, allowing it to pass down the pipe while compost-ready organic solids are collected and held in a sealed 10-litre container that can be removed to tip onto a compost pile or into a compost collection bin.

Nicolov said the system will capture 95 per cent of the solid waste flushed down the drain, and could render obsolete the need for countertop compost bins that can smell and breed fruit flies.

Time’s list, which annually highlights inventions making the world better and smarter, noted the Sepura system may help solve the problem of the estimated 40 million tonnes of food waste Americans generate annually, preventing it from ending up in landfills or being flushed down the drain.

The $580 US system is currently available for $380 US online if pre-ordered before the company starts shipping.

Nicolov said the company has been pushing sales over the past year, marketing the product to builders and developers in particular. “The difficulty there is we’re a new product and building developers don’t like risk — they like products that have been around,” he said.

Nicolov said builders have told him, however, that they have been looking for a product to replace the outdated garburator in new homes.

A series of prototypes have been installed in homes around Victoria, and Nicolov is ­optimistic that it’s just a matter of time before Sepura becomes a must-have for new homes.

The unit can also be installed in older homes as an upgrade. Nicolov said it can be attached to any kitchen sink and does not require a custom build.

The company, which has five employees spread around B.C., is starting to ramp up large-scale manufacturing of the latest model of Sepura at a plant in Ohio.

Nicolov expects they will start shipping before the end of the first fiscal quarter in 2021.

“It’s been a ton of work but it’s super exciting,” he said.

“I can’t wait to get people’s reactions.”

aduffy@timescolonist.com

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