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The future of media: more digital and more economic pain, Reuters Institute says – Yahoo Canada Finance

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The future of media: more digital and more economic pain, Reuters Institute says
Men wearing protective face masks work at a printing press amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Madrid

By Guy Faulconbridge

LONDON (Reuters) – The coronavirus outbreak has prompted a significant increase in news consumption but the economic turmoil is forcing news businesses to accelerate their move to digital, The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism said.

The coronavirus lockdowns prompted a global rise in viewing of television and online news though concerns about misinformation remain high, with Facebook and WhatsApp seen as the main channels for spreading so called “fake news”.

The broader picture is that the outbreak is accelerating the trends wrought by the technological revolution, including the rise of smartphones as an interface of news consumption, The Reuters Institute said in its annual Digital News Report (www.digitalnewsreport.org).

“The headline is that we see an accelerated move to digital media and mobile media and various kinds of platforms,” Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, director of the Reuters Institute, said by telephone.

“This is accompanied by a continued decline in trust in news and growing concerns over misinformation, in particular on social media and from some politicians.”

The biggest increase in concern over media misinformation was in Hong Kong – where anti-government protesters have opposed attempts by China to tighten its control of the former British colony.

The business of news remains bleak. Media across the world are cutting staff to cope with a dramatic fall in advertising revenue.

But a ray of hope may be that increasing numbers of people are willing to pay for news online, though that may also increase informational inequality as many cannot afford top quality journalism.

And a “winner takes all” process can be seen: Around half of those that subscribe to any online or combined package in the United States use the New York Times or the Washington Post, the Reuters Institute found.

A similar trend can be seen in the United Kingdom with The Times or the Telegraph.

And for those predicting the dominance of video news, the Reuters Institute found that in a number of countries including the United Kingdom, Australia, France, and South Korea, people under 35 preferred to read rather than watch news online.

The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism is a research centre at the University of Oxford that tracks media trends. The Thomson Reuters Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Thomson Reuters, funds the Reuters Institute.

(Editing by Stephen Addison)

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MacGregor Critical of Canadian Media for Coverage of 'Act of Terror' at Rideau Hall – My Cowichan Valley Now

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Our local Member of Parliament is responding to Canadian Ranger Corey Hurran breaching the grounds of Rideau Hall recently with shotguns, revolvers, and a rifle.

In a tweet, Cowichan-Malahat-Langford MP Alistair MacGregor wrote, “You don’t break into the grounds where the PM lives, armed with multiple loaded firearms, wanting to have a chat.”

MacGregor said we need to call this what it is, ‘an act of terror’ and it’s surprising at the way this incident has been portrayed in the Canadian media.

“The way its been portrayed in the media is problematic because I think we need to call this out for what it is, it’s an act of terror; when a person tries to intimidate or threaten the head of our government with loaded weapons,” said MacGregor. “I’m actually quite surprised that this hasn’t been more of a newsworthy event.”

Corey Hurran, a 46-year-old Canadian Ranger from Manitoba breached the grounds of Rideau Hall, where the Prime Minister was staying on Thursday, with loaded shotguns, a rifle, and a revolver.

MacGregor said it’s surprising how the media is portraying this ‘act of terrorism,’ and this type of incident needs to be condemned.

“I just think we need to condemn this kind of thing and express our condolences to the Prime Minister and to his family, it must have been a very scary thing,” said MacGregor. “He has good security around him but the fact that it happened in the first place is very problematic.”

On Friday, Hurran was charged with 22 offences, the majority of which were firearms-related charges.

They included Careless Use of a Firearm, Possession of a Weapon for a Dangerous Purpose, and Possession of a Prohibited or Restricted Firearm.

He remains in custody and is expected back in court on July 17th.

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U.S. looking at banning Chinese social media apps, including TikTok, Pompeo says – CBC.ca

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Monday that the United States is “certainly looking at” banning Chinese social media apps, including TikTok, suggesting it shared information with the Chinese government, a charge the company denied.

“I don’t want to get out in front of the president, but it’s something we’re looking at,” Pompeo said in an interview with Fox News, referencing Donald Trump.

U.S. lawmakers have raised national security concerns over TikTok’s handling of user data, saying they were worried about Chinese laws requiring domestic companies “to support and co-operate with intelligence work controlled by the Chinese Communist Party.”

Pompeo said Americans should be cautious in using the short-form video app owned by China-based ByteDance.

“Only if you want your private information in the hands of the Chinese Communist Party,” Pompeo remarked when asked if he would recommend that people download TikTok.

In response to his comments, TikTok told Reuters it has never provided user data to China.

“We have no higher priority than promoting a safe and secure app experience for our users. We have never provided user data to the Chinese government, nor would we do so if asked,” TikTok said in an emailed statement.

The app, which is not available in China, has sought to distance itself from its Chinese roots to appeal to a global audience.

Increasing China-U.S. tensions

Pompeo’s remarks also come amid increasing U.S.-China tensions over the handling of the coronavirus outbreak, China’s actions in the former British colony of Hong Kong and a nearly two-year trade war.

TikTok was recently banned in India along with 58 other Chinese apps after a border clash between India and China.

Reuters reported late on Monday that TikTok would exit the Hong Kong market within days, after China’s establishment of a sweeping new national security law for the region.

Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule in 1997 with the guarantee of freedoms and far-reaching autonomy under a “one country, two systems” formula agreed to with Britain.

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EU executive expresses concern over Hungary's media freedom – The Guardian

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BUDAPEST (Reuters) – A senior European Commission official has expressed concern for the independence of Index.hu, one of Hungary’s last major independent news websites and a leading critic of Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s government.

“What you are doing, the values you are fighting for, media freedom and pluralism, are essential for democracy,” Vera Jourova, the commission’s Vice President for Values and Transparency, said in a message to Index published on its web site. “You can count on my support.”

Editor-in-chief Szabolcs Dull said last month that Index was at risk of losing its independence because of “external influence”.

He said Index wanted to remain free of government influence and undue pressure from businessmen and advisers with government ties.

Orban has extended his influence over many walks of life in Hungary during his decade-long rule.

Pro-government businessman Miklos Vaszily bought a major stake in a company with control of Index’s revenue stream in March, raising fears of interference with the web site to favour Orban.

Vaszily, who has not returned Reuters requests for comment, has denied he wants to muzzle Index, saying economic problems need to be fixed. But staff are on alert as Vaszily had previously turned their competitor, Origo.hu, into a government mouthpiece.

Jourova said Index’s business situation should not be used as a pretext to undermine its freedom.

“While readership and audiences have been record high, revenues have been heavily hit. Economic pressure should not turn into political pressure…I would like to express my solidarity with the staff of Index.”

Media freedom was a key issue when the EU warned Hungary in April to respect the bloc’s values as it fought against the coronavirus pandemic.

(Reporting by Marton Dunai; Editing by Angus MacSwan)

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