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Trump decries ‘lowlifes’ and racism in Canada; In The News for June 3 – CityNews Toronto

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In The News is a roundup of stories from The Canadian Press designed to kickstart your day. Here is what’s on the radar of our editors for the morning of June 3 …

American anti-racism protests …

Undeterred by curfews, protesters streamed back into the nation’s streets Tuesday, hours after President Donald Trump pressed governors to put down the violence set off by George Floyd’s death and demanded that New York call up the National Guard to stop the “lowlifes and losers.”

But most protests passed peacefully, and while there were scattered reports of looting in New York City, the country appeared calmer by late Tuesday than it did a day earlier, when violence swept through multiple cities.

The president, meanwhile, amplified his hard-line calls from Monday, when he threatened to send in the military to restore order if governors didn’t do it.

“NYC, CALL UP THE NATIONAL GUARD,” he tweeted. “The lowlifes and losers are ripping you apart. Act fast!”

One day after a crackdown on peaceful protesters near the White House, thousands of demonstrators massed a block away from the presidential mansion, facing law enforcement personnel standing behind a black chain-link fence. The fence was put up overnight to block access to Lafayette Park, just across the street from the White House.

“Last night pushed me way over the edge,” said Jessica DeMaio, 40, of Washington, who attended a Floyd protest Tuesday for the first time. “Being here is better than being at home feeling helpless.”

The crowd remained in place after the city’s 7 p.m. curfew passed, defying warnings that the response from law enforcement could be even more forceful. But the protest lacked the tension of the previous nights’ demonstrations. The crowd Tuesday was peaceful, even polite. At one point, the crowd booed when a protester climbed a light post and took down a street sign. A chant went up: “Peaceful protest!”

COVID-19 in Canada …

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will continue today to make the case for a co-ordinated global response to cushion the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the world’s poorest countries.

He’ll be among the leaders and heads of state to deliver remarks during a virtual summit of the Organization of African, Caribbean, and Pacific States (OACPS).

Among other things, he is expected to promise that Canada will partner with developing countries, which stand to be the hardest hit by the pandemic, and help to rally the world behind measures like debt relief to help them survive the crisis.

That is similar to the message Trudeau delivered last week while co-hosting a major United Nations summit, alongside UN secretary general Antonio Guterres and Jamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness.

Without a global co-ordinated recovery plan, the UN estimates the pandemic could slash nearly US$8.5 trillion from the world economy over the next two years, forcing 34.3 million people into extreme poverty this year and potentially 130 million more over the course of the decade.

While no country has escaped the economic ravages of the deadly novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, developing countries, already in debt distress before the pandemic, cannot afford the kinds of emergency benefits and economic stimulus measures undertaken in wealthy, industrialized countries like Canada.

And this …

Nova Scotia’s largest nursing home is planning for a future of private rooms to keep residents safe, but it has taken a wrenching pandemic death toll to create the shift — and it remains unclear whether government will fund a long-term fix.

“We’re currently down to fewer than 25 rooms with shared accommodations at the Halifax campus,” Janet Simm, the Northwood facility’s chief executive, said in a recent interview.

That’s a huge shift from before the pandemic when more than 240 residents lived in two- or three-person units. Now, fewer than 50 people remain in the shared spaces, some of whom are couples or others who specifically request a roommate, Simm said.

But the facility’s desire to create more space, which its board sought for years before the pandemic, unfolded through tragedy rather than design.

COVID-19 illnesses spread among the 485 residents after asymptomatic workers brought the virus there in early April, and Simm says the bulk of the 53 who had died, as of Tuesday, and the 240 infected were in shared units.

COVID-19 in sports …

Khari Jones doesn’t have to look far for a reminder that racism exists in Canada.

The Montreal Alouettes head coach divulged during a teleconference Tuesday he received death threats while he was the quarterback of the CFL’s Winnipeg Blue Bombers because of his interracial marriage. Jones is black and his wife, Justine, is white.

An emotional Jones — speaking just over a week after a white policeman kneeled on the neck of a black man, resulting in a tragic death in Minneapolis — said the threats came in the form of letters that remain in his possession.

“It’s just a reminder you always have to be on alert a little bit,” Jones said. “It could’ve been one person but one is still too many and to do that on the basis of a person’s skin colour is horrible.

“Every once in a while, every blue moon I take a look at them. They never found the person who wrote the letters — he used a fake name — but he’s still out there, people like him are still out there. That was 20-something years ago and it’s still happening.”

Interest rate announcement looms …

The Bank of Canada is expected to keep its key interest rate unchanged this morning on the first day of governor Tiff Macklem’s tenure.

Economists expect the central bank will maintain its target for the overnight rate at 0.25 per cent, which former governor Stephen Poloz has repeatedly said is as low as it can go.

Poloz and the bank’s governing council would have met over the past few days and finalized the rate decision last night.

Macklem likely would have been part of the meetings, but it’s unlikely that the language of the rate announcement will fully capture his views.

Instead of focusing on the rate itself, experts say they will be paying close attention to the language used in the rate announcement about the expected path for the economy in the coming weeks and months.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 3, 2020

The Canadian Press

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Canadian drivers with U.S. licence plates harassed by fellow Canadians – CBC.ca

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Some Canadians driving cars with U.S. licence plates say they’ve endured vandalism, harassment and even a minor assault from fellow Canadians convinced that they’re Americans illegally in Canada. 

Lisa Watt said she was harassed twice in Calgary last month — she believes because of her Texas licence plates. 

In one incident, she said a driver stopped right behind her car in a parking lot and glared at her, and in another situation, a driver tailgated her car for several kilometres before pulling up beside her and flipping her the finger. 

“It made me angry,” said Watt, a Canadian citizen who moved to Houston in 2000 for work. She drove to Calgary in June to visit her 84-year-old mother, who was feeling isolated during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“I’m here to help my mother. I have every right to be here.”

To help stop the spread of the coronavirus, the Canada-U.S. land border remains closed to non-essential traffic. As a result, some Canadians are alarmed when they spot cars with U.S. licence plates, especially as COVID-19 cases south of the border escalate.

There is reason for concern. Alberta RCMP said that since mid-June, they have fined 10 Americans $1,200 each after they sneaked in to Banff National Park. 

RCMP have issued 10 tickets to Americans since mid-June at Banff National Park. There are legitimate reasons for a U.S.-plated vehicle in Canada during the pandemic but stopping to see the sights is not one of them. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

Americans are allowed to drive straight through Canada to Alaska for work or to return home, but they can’t stop in Banff — or anywhere else — to see the sights.

However, not all drivers of cars with U.S. plates in Canada are breaking the rules. 

Watt wants Albertans to know she’s a patriotic Canadian who’s taking every precaution while in the country. She self-quarantined for 14 days when arriving in Calgary and wears a face mask in stores. 

She said both incidents of harassment happened on June 21, the day she finished her quarantine and headed to town to run errands.

Watt, right, and her mother, Maureen, pictured in Calgary. (Submitted by Maureen Watt)

‘You can’t judge a book by its cover’

As a result of her experiences, Watt started driving her mother’s car — which has Alberta plates. 

“I’m a little afraid to leave my car parked anywhere for fear somebody does something to it,” she said. “I’d like people to understand that people with U.S. licence plates have legitimate reasons for being here.”

Mayor Phil Harding of the Township of Muskoka Lakes also wants to spread that message. 

“You can’t judge a book by its cover,” said Harding, whose township is part of the Muskoka region, a vacation hot spot in Ontario. 

The mayor said he recently heard from several Canadians with U.S.-plated cars in the region, who claimed they were accused of being Americans unlawfully in Canada.

“‘You shouldn’t be here. Americans aren’t allowed. How did you get across the border?'” said Harding, about the types of accusations the drivers have fielded from local residents. 

Car keyed at marina

In one case, a woman reported that her husband’s car — which has Michigan plates — was scratched with a key, said the mayor. 

CBC News confirmed the incident with the woman who said the approximately metre-long scratch appeared after the car had been parked at a marina on June 6. 

The woman said she and her husband are Canadian but that her husband works for an American company and drives a company car with U.S. plates. The woman asked that their names be kept confidential because her husband doesn’t want his workplace associated with this story. 

“We think it’s terrible and are really aware that we are a target with our U.S.-plated company vehicle,” said the woman about the incident in an email. “This makes you aware that the cross-border tension is building.”

WATCH | COVID-19 could close Canada-U.S. border for a year, expert says:

Infection control epidemiologist Colin Furness predicts the Canada-U.S. border will only open if a COVID-19 vaccine is created or if enough people have been infected with the virus and build herd immunity. 9:17

Snowbird accosted

In another incident in Huntsville, also in the Muskoka region, Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) said a Canadian filed a police report after he was allegedly accosted by two men upset over the Florida plates on his car. 

OPP spokesperson Jason Folz said the incident happened on June 12 at a car wash. 

“They harassed him, and the assault was they poked him in the chest, demanding to know why he was in Canada.”

Folz said the man is a snowbird who spends winters in Florida and owns a car with Florida plates. 

“People are stressed [about COVID-19], and it comes out in strange ways. This is perhaps one of those ways,” said Folz about the incident. 

Lawyer avoids crossing border

U.S. immigration lawyer Len Saunders said several of his clients — who are dual Canadian-U.S. citizens or essential workers crossing the border — have complained of mean looks when driving their U.S.-plated car in Canada. 

As a result, Saunders said he avoids crossing the border, even though he can as an essential worker and a dual citizen. 

“I’m concerned about being socially shamed up there in B.C., driving a U.S.-plated car because I’ve heard from multiple clients, stories of dirty looks,” said Saunders, whose office sits close to the British Columbia border in Blaine, Wash.

He said he can understand why some Canadians get upset when spotting U.S. licence plates in the country, considering COVID-19 cases are spiking in some U.S. states.

But they must remember that many people driving U.S.-plated cars in Canada are there for a valid reason, Saunders said. 

“They really have to look at the big picture before they pass judgment.”

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Canadian Armed Forces member arrested after gaining access to Rideau Hall grounds – CBC.ca

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Police have arrested a Canadian Armed Forces member who they say was armed and had gained access to the grounds at Rideau Hall early Thursday morning.

The man “breached the main pedestrian entrance” at 1 Sussex Drive at around 6:30 a.m. ET with his vehicle, the RCMP said in a statement.

When the impact disabled his vehicle, the man headed to the Rideau Hall greenhouse, where he was “rapidly contained” by RCMP members on patrol, the force said. He was apprehended shortly before 8:30 a.m. without incident and taken into custody for questioning.

CBC News has confirmed the man in custody is Corey Hurren, an active member of the military who serves as a Canadian Ranger.

The Rangers are a component of the Canadian Army Reserve that serves in the remote and coastal regions, typically offering help with national security and public safety operations.

Someone who answered the phone at the Hurren household in Manitoba on Thursday evening confirmed he’d been arrested but said she didn’t want to speak further about the day’s events.

Hurren is described in promotional material for his business as a veteran who recently rejoined the military as a Canadian Ranger. (Facebook)

Hurren ran a business called GrindHouse Fine Foods, which makes meat products. In promotional material for his business, Hurren is described as a Royal Canadian Artillery veteran who recently rejoined the military as a Canadian Ranger. 

He is also a past president of his local Lion’s Club, an active volunteer in his community of Bowsman, north-west of Winnipeg, and his group of Rangers were on call to be part of the military’s assistance with the COVID-19 response.

WATCH | Canadian Armed Forces member armed with long gun arrested at Rideau Hall:

A man from Manitoba arrested on the grounds of Rideau Hall with a long gun and a note is an active member of the Canadian Armed Forces. 1:49

But in his posts on Facebook, he also revealed that the pandemic had taken a toll on his business.

“I’m not sure what will be left of our economy, industries and businesses when this all ends,” he wrote May 26.

Both the RCMP and Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan’s office previously confirmed the man arrested is in the military.

A source told CBC News the man had driven from Manitoba and had a long gun and a note with him. The source — who spoke on the condition they not be named because they were not authorized to discuss the case — did not know the details of the note nor what kind of long gun it was.

Hurren allegedly drove a truck through the gates near 24 Sussex Drive and proceeded on foot to Rideau Hall, not far from Rideau Cottage, where the prime minister lives with his family. (Google, CBC News)

Rideau Hall is the Governor General’s official residence, and the greenhouse is attached to the residence at the back. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his family also live on the property at Rideau Cottage, not far from the greenhouse.

The Prime Minister’s Office confirmed that the prime minister and his family were not at Rideau Cottage Wednesday night or Thursday morning. RCMP said the Governor General wasn’t present either. 

In a statement to CBC, Gov. Gen. Julie Payette’s office said she had been living on the grounds prior to the pandemic and that all staff were safe.

One of the wrought-iron gates leading to the property was left visibly damaged after the incident and debris could be seen on the ground earlier today.

A robot could be seen examining a black pickup truck just inside the gates at Rideau Hall earlier today. The truck’s airbags also appeared to have been deployed.

Police tape is strung up outside Rideau Hall on Thursday. The intruder was ‘rapidly contained’ according to the RCMP. (Andrew Lee/CBC)

The inside of the truck’s cab appeared to have been packed with boxes and other items.

The robot opened the door and removed several items from the truck, including an orange cooler and boxes.

A robot could be seen examining a black pickup truck on the grounds of Rideau Hall Thursday morning. (Francis Ferland/CBC)

There were also officers inspecting the underside of the truck with mirrors, while others had dogs and were inspecting both the inside of the truck and its contents.

The RCMP said late Thursday afternoon that charges are pending against the man, although they have not yet publicly confirmed his identity.

“Through our members’ vigilance, quick action and successful de-escalation techniques, this highly volatile incident was resolved swiftly and peacefully. I am very proud of all our people and our partners who moved fast and acted decisively to contain this threat,” RCMP deputy commissioner Mike Duheme said in a statement.

Peter Lewis lives near Rideau Hall and was cycling along the Vanier Parkway just before 7 a.m. ET when he saw “a stream” of RCMP vehicles heading toward downtown.

WATCH | Police use a robot to investigate truck: 

RCMP say they arrested an armed man on the grounds of Rideau Hall early Thursday morning. Neither the prime minister nor the Governor General were present at the time. 1:10

He then saw what he described as an armoured police vehicle.

“It’s a little concerning,” he said. “I hope everybody’s all right.”

The grounds at Rideau Hall, as well as the house itself, are normally major tourist attractions in the nation’s capital, where people enjoy picnics on the grass or wander the gardens.

Both have been closed as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

As of 6:15 p.m. ET, roads outside Rideau Hall were still closed for the investigation.

Officers were seen inspecting the truck and items removed from it, including an orange cooler. (Francis Ferland/CBC)

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Canada adds 302 coronavirus cases on Thursday

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Canada’s daily coronavirus death toll rose by more than two dozen on Thursday, while 302 new cases were diagnosed across the country.

Though the number of cases and deaths is declining, Thursday’s data brings the national death toll to 8,642. More than 104,000 people have tested positive for the virus, and though more than 63,000 have recovered.

The number of tests administered across the country stood at over 2.9 million, with Ontario leading the country in overall tests completed.

Ontario added the highest number of cases on Thursday at 153, plus an additional 149 cases from Wednesday that were not previously announced due to the Canada Day holiday.

Eight people have died since figures were last released, for a total of 2,680. The province also announced the rollout of its coronavirus contact tracing app would be delayed though no new launch date was provided.

Quebec, the hardest-hit province in the country, added 69 new cases for a total of 55,593. An additional 14 deaths were announced, bringing the province’s total to 5,541.

Alberta, which was also reporting a two-day total, added one death along with 94 cases.

An additional three deaths occurred in B.C. since the province’s last update on Tuesday. The province has also added 24 new COVID-19 cases, including 15 that were not previously announced due to the holiday.

Saskatchewan added 10 cases, four of which were from July 1, along with one additional fatality. Fourteen people have died due to the coronavirus in that province.

Nova Scotia, which is poised to enter a travel “bubble” with the other Atlantic provinces on Friday, counted one new case.

Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and P.E.I, along with Yukon and the Northwest Territories, added no additional cases on Thursday.

Nunavut, which remains the only province or territory where the virus has not been formally diagnosed, announced its first presumptive case of the virus.

Nunavut’s chief public health officer said in a statement that an individual at the Mary River Mine, who had travelled to the territory for work, is in isolation and “doing well.”

A case announced in the territory in April was later determined to be a false positive.

Meanwhile, the U.S. added more than 50,000 coronavirus cases, the highest daily total since the pandemic began.

Around the world, 10.9 million people have tested positive for the coronavirus, and nearly 520,000 have succumbed to COVID-19, according to a tally kept by researchers at Johns Hopkins University.

 

Source: global-news

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