Connect with us

Business

What you need to know about COVID-19 in Ottawa on Wednesday, March 17 – CBC.ca

Published

 on


Recent developments:

What’s the latest?

Ottawa is reporting 61 more COVID-19 cases and one more death Wednesday. Some of its numbers to watch pushed further into red-zone territory.

The Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit, which tightened rules in Smiths Falls and Perth today, recorded 29 more cases Wednesday, 16 of them in the previous 24 hours.

March is on pace to be the month with the most COVID-19 cases yet.

Overnight camps in Ontario are already preparing to hopefully welcome back campers after last summer’s shutdown because of the pandemic, even though the province has yet to give them the green light.

How many cases are there?

As of Wednesday, 15,757 Ottawa residents have tested positive for COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic. There are currently 605 known active cases, 14,702 resolved cases and 450 deaths.

Public health officials have reported more than 28,000 COVID-19 cases across eastern Ontario and western Quebec, including more than 26,100 resolved cases.

Elsewhere in eastern Ontario, 134 people have died of COVID-19 and 167 people have died in western Quebec. 

Akwesasne has had more than 250 residents test positive on the Canadian side of the border, five of them active cases, and seven deaths. It’s had more than 500 cases combined with its southern section.

Kitigan Zibi has had 22 confirmed cases and Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory has had seven, with one death.

CBC Ottawa is profiling those who’ve died of COVID-19. If you’d like to share your loved one’s story, please get in touch.

What can I do?

Restaurants, gyms, personal care services, theatres and non-essential businesses are open across eastern Ontario. Most sports can also resume.

Social gatherings can have up to 10 people indoors or 25 people outdoors. Organized events can be larger.

People are asked to only have close contact with people they live with, be masked and distanced for all other in-person contact, and only travel for essential reasons, especially between differently coloured zones.

Local health units can also set their own rules, like what Kingston’s is doing around St. Patrick’s Day and Lanark County’s is doing for sports.

Eastern Ontario ranges from orange to green under the province’s colour-coded pandemic scale.

Ottawa Public Health and the Eastern Ontario Health Unit (EOHU) are orange, with more restrictions than other regions. 

Western Quebec’s gyms and restaurants can open under its orange zone rules, as can non-essential businesses

Outdoor gatherings of up to eight people are allowed. The region’s curfew hours are 9:30 p.m. until 5 a.m.

Grenville-sur-la-Rouge and some of the surrounding area remains in red.

Like in Ontario, people in western Quebec are asked not to have close contact with anyone they don’t live with and are discouraged from travelling from one region to another.

Next week local high schoolers can return to in-class learning full time and sports rules will be relaxed.

Distancing and isolating

The novel coronavirus primarily spreads through droplets when an infected person speaks, coughs, sneezes, or breathes onto someone or something. These droplets can hang in the air.

People can be contagious without symptoms, even after getting a vaccine. New coronavirus variants can be more contagious and are spreading quickly in some places.

This means it is important to take precautions now and in the months to come like staying home while symptomatic — and getting help with costs if needed — keeping hands and frequently touched surfaces clean and maintaining distance from anyone you don’t live with, even with a mask on.

Toronto Maple Leafs centre John Tavares skates past cut-outs of Ottawa Senators fans during warm-up at the Canadian Tire Centre March 14, 2021. The Senators were selling cut-outs at the time for $75, with proceeds to the Senators Community Foundation. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

Masks, preferably ones that fit snugly and have three layers, are mandatory in indoor public settings in Ontario and Quebec.

OPH says residents should wear masks outside their homes whenever possible.

Health Canada recommends older adults and people with underlying medical conditions and/or weakened immune systems stay home as much as possible and get help with errands.

Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms should self-isolate, as should those who’ve been ordered to do so by their public health unit. The length varies in Quebec and Ontario.

People have to show proof of a recent negative COVID-19 test to enter Canada by land without a fine and have to pay for their stay in a quarantine hotel if entering by air.

Vaccines

Four COVID-19 vaccines have been approved in Canada.

Canada’s task force said first doses offer such strong protection that people can wait up to four months to get a second, meaning jurisdictions can spread first doses widely.

About 163,000 doses have been given out in the wider region since mid-December, including about 80,000 doses in Ottawa and 21,000 in western Quebec.

Ontario’s first doses generally went to care home residents and health-care workers.

The provincewide campaign has expanded further into Phase 1 to include more priority groups such as all people over age 80. People can book appointments online or over the phone.

Local health units have some flexibility in the larger framework, so check their websites — as they’re asking people to keep their phone lines clear — for specifics, along with locations and hours of clinics.

People who either are age 60 to 64 or will be turning 60 or 65 this year in the Kingston area can contact one of nearly 50 pharmacies for a vaccine appointment as part of a pilot project.

Phase 2 should include people with underlying health conditions in April, then people who can’t work from home and down in age to 60 in June.

WATCH | A Q&A on the AstraZeneca-Oxford vaccine:

Dr. Christopher Labos, a Montreal cardiologist with a degree in epidemiology, clarifies details about the AstraZeneca-Oxford vaccine, and explains why he believes it’s safe. 5:04

Quebec also started by vaccinating people in care homes and health-care workers.

The vaccination plan has moved to people age 70 and older at six western Quebec clinics, then essential workers and finally the general public.

Officials expect everyone over the age of 65 to be vaccinated by mid-April and everyone who wants a shot to be able to get one by by Fête nationale June 24.

People who qualify can make an appointment online or over the phone. Pharmacists there will also be giving shots.

The COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Gatineau, Que.’s Palais des congrès opened March 11, 2021. (David Richard/Radio-Canada)

Symptoms and testing

COVID-19 can range from a cold-like illness to a severe lung infection, with common symptoms including fever, a cough, vomiting and loss of taste or smell. Children tend to have an upset stomach and/or a rash.

If you have severe symptoms, call 911.

Mental health can also be affected by the pandemic, and resources are available to help.

WATCH | A new approach to treating eating disorders:

The pandemic has led to a surge in eating disorders and a need to change the approach to treatment. Canadian researchers have developed a new set of guidelines to treat patients virtually. 2:01

In eastern Ontario:

Anyone seeking a test should book an appointment.

Ontario recommends only getting tested if you have symptoms, if you’ve been told to by your health unit or the province, or if you fit certain other criteria.

People without symptoms but who are part of the province’s targeted testing strategy can make an appointment at select pharmacies. Travellers who need a test have very few local options to pay for one.

Ottawa has ten regular test sites, with mobile sites wherever demand is particularly high.

The Eastern Ontario Health Unit has sites in Alexandria, Casselman, Cornwall, Hawkesbury, Rockland and Winchester.

The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark health unit has permanent sites in Almonte, Brockville, Kemptville and Smiths Falls and a mobile clinic.

People can arrange a test in Picton over the phone or in Bancroft, Belleville and Trenton, where online booking is preferred.

Renfrew County test clinic locations are posted weekly. Residents can also call their family doctor or 1-844-727-6404 with health questions.

Kingston’s main test site is at the Beechgrove Complex, another is in Napanee.

Queen’s University is urging students who have been in contact with anyone outside their household to get a COVID-19 test after a pair of outbreaks. There is a test clinic on campus.

In western Quebec:

Tests are strongly recommended for people with symptoms and their contacts.

Outaouais residents can make an appointment in Gatineau at 135 blvd. Saint-Raymond or 617 ave. Buckingham. They can check the wait time for the Saint-Raymond site.

There are recurring clinics by appointment in communities such as Maniwaki and Petite-Nation.

Call 1-877-644-4545 with questions, including if walk-in testing is available nearby.

First Nations, Inuit and Métis:

Akwesasne has a COVID-19 test site by appointment only and a curfew of 11 p.m. to 5 a.m.

Anyone returning to the community on the Canadian side of the international border who’s been farther than 160 kilometres away — or visited Montreal — for non-essential reasons is asked to self-isolate for 14 days.

People in Pikwakanagan can book a COVID-19 test by calling 613-625-1175. Anyone in Tyendinaga who’s interested in a test can call 613-967-3603 and in Kitigan Zibi, 819-449-5593.

Inuit in Ottawa can call the Akausivik Inuit Family Health Team at 613-740-0999 for service, including testing and vaccines, in Inuktitut or English on weekdays.

For more information

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Union ratifies deal with Bombardier at Downsview; talks with De Havilland continue – CP24 Toronto's Breaking News

Published

 on


TORONTO – Unifor says members of two of its locals have ratified an agreement with Bombardier Aviation at its Downsview plant in north Toronto.

Unifor National President Jerry Dias says in a statement that the three-year collective agreement approved by members of Local 112 and 673 makes “significant progress” on key issues such as pensions, as well as on job protection against outsourcing and the use of contractors.

Workers will see raises of 0.5 per cent in Year 1, 0.75 per cent in Year 2 and one per cent in Year 3.

The workers launched a strike late last month against the business jet manufacturer and De Havilland, which it says had made Dash 8 turboprops at the facility.

Unifor says the ratified deal covers approximately 1,500 Bombardier Aviation workers, and runs from June 23, 2021 to June 23, 2024.

But it says 700 De Havilland workers remain on strike as negotiations between it and the company continue, with a dedicated picket line in operation at the De Havilland area of the facility.

“As the industry recovers from this once-in-a-century pandemic and Bombardier prepares to move production to a new facility at Pearson Airport, these collective agreements will ensure our highly skilled members will maintain wages, pension, benefits and other working conditions that are among the best in the industry,” Dias said in the statement.

The union has said the future of the Dash 8 program is the focus of talks with De Havilland.

De Havilland announced earlier this year that it would no longer produce new Dash 8s at the facility beyond currently confirmed orders. De Havilland indicated two years ago that work will end at Downsview once lease agreements for the land expire.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 31, 2021.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Ontario reports 258 new COVID-19 cases on Saturday – CBC.ca

Published

 on


Ontario reported another 258 cases of COVID-19 on Saturday. The latest case count includes 53 cases in Toronto, 33 in York Region, 28 in the Region of Waterloo, 27 in Hamilton and 26 in Peel Region.

Here are some other key pandemic indicators and figures from the Ministry of Health’s daily provincial update:

Seven-day average of daily cases: 183

Tests completed: 19,112

Provincewide test positivity rate: 1.2 per cent

Active cases: 1,606

Patients in ICU with COVID-related illnesses: 112; 83 needed a ventilator to breathe

Deaths: Six, pushing the official toll to 9,345

Vaccinations: 81,590 doses administered for a total of 19,459,198 as of 8 p.m. on Friday.

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Business

One New Case of COVID-19, Two Recoveries – Government of Nova Scotia

Published

 on


Today, July 30, Nova Scotia is reporting one new case of COVID-19 and two recoveries.

The case is in Central Zone and is under investigation.

There have been 4,200 cases from March 15 to July 27, 2021. Of those:

  • 28 (0.7 per cent) were fully vaccinated
  • 235 (5.6 per cent) were partially vaccinated
  • 3,937 (93.7 per cent) were unvaccinated

There were 254 people hospitalized. Of those:

  • 2 (0.8 per cent) were fully vaccinated
  • 28 (11 per cent) were partially vaccinated
  • 224 (88.2 per cent) were unvaccinated

Twenty-seven people died. Of those:

  • 1 (3.7 per cent) was fully vaccinated
  • 3 (11.1 per cent) were partially vaccinated
  • 23 (85.2 per cent) were unvaccinated

As of today, Nova Scotia has nine active cases of COVID-19. Of those, one person is in a hospital COVID-19 unit. The person is in ICU.

There were 3,364 tests administered between July 23 and 30 at the rapid-testing pop-up sites in Halifax, Dartmouth, Cole Harbour, Bedford, Hubbards, Spryfield and Brooklyn, Hants Co.

On July 29, Nova Scotia Health Authority’s labs completed 2,964 tests.

As of July 29, 1,345,401 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered. Of those, 606,975 Nova Scotians have received their second dose.

Since April 1, there have been 4,145 positive COVID-19 cases and 27 deaths. Cases range in age from under 10 to over 90. There are 4,109 resolved cases. Cumulative cases may change as data is updated in Panorama.

Testing advice:

Nova Scotians with or without symptoms can book a test at https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/en for primary assessment centres across the province. Those with no symptoms are encouraged to use one of the primary assessment centres with drop-in testing, pop-up sites, or public health mobile units if they want to be tested.

More information on testing can be found at https://www.nshealth.ca/coronavirustesting

Anyone with COVID-19 symptoms is advised to self-isolate and book a COVID-19 test.

Anyone advised by public health that they were a close contact needs to complete a full 14-day quarantine, regardless of test results, unless they are fully vaccinated. If they are fully vaccinated at least 14 days before the exposure date, they do not need to self-isolate as long as they are not experiencing any COVID-19 symptoms. They should still get tested and should monitor for symptoms up to 14 days after the exposure date. If symptoms develop, they should get tested and self-isolate until they receive a negative test result.

Symptoms and self-assessment:

Nova Scotians should visit https://covid-self-assessment.novascotia.ca/ to do a self-assessment if in the past 48 hours they have had or are currently experiencing mild symptoms, including:

  • fever (i.e. chills/sweats) or cough (new or worsening)
  • sore throat
  • runny nose/nasal congestion
  • headache
  • shortness of breath/difficulty breathing

People should call 811 if they cannot access the online self-assessment or wish to speak with a nurse about their symptoms.

Anyone with symptoms should immediately self-isolate and book a test.

Quick Facts:

  • a state of emergency was declared under the Emergency Management Act on March 22, 2020, and extended to Aug. 8, 2021

Additional Resources:

More information on COVID-19 case data, testing and vaccines is available at: https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/data/

Nova Scotians can find accurate, up-to-date information, handwashing posters and fact sheets at: https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus

Nova’s Scotia’s five-phase reopening plan, announced May 28, 2021: https://novascotia.ca/reopening-plan/

Businesses and other organizations can find information to help them safely reopen and operate at: https://novascotia.ca/reopening-nova-scotia

A list of primary assessment locations, including locations with drop-in testing, is available at: https://www.nshealth.ca/coronavirustesting#assessment-centre-locations

More information about public health text notifications of positive COVID-19 cases and close contacts is available here: https://www.nshealth.ca/news/public-health-begins-contacting-positive-covid-19-cases-close-contacts-text-message

More information on what is considered essential travel is available here: https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/travel/#from-outside-atlantic-canada

Government of Canada: https://canada.ca/coronavirus or 1-833-784-4397 (toll-free)

The Mental Health Provincial Crisis Line is available 24/7 to anyone experiencing a mental health or addictions crisis, or someone concerned about them, by calling 1-888-429-8167 (toll-free)

Anyone needing help with a non-crisis mental health or addiction concern can call Community Mental Health and Addictions at 1-855-922-1122 (toll-free) weekdays 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Kids Help Phone is available 24/7 by calling 1-800-668-6868 (toll-free)

For help or information about domestic violence 24/7, call 1-855-225-0220 (toll-free)

-30-

Adblock test (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending