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Granite Provides Investment Update and Announces Term Loan Refinancing – Financial Post

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TORONTO — Granite Real Estate Investment Trust (“Granite”) (TSX: GRT.UN / NYSE: GRP.U) announced today that it has acquired two income producing properties and has agreed to acquire three development properties, together comprising approximately 2.5 million square feet (“SF”) at a combined purchase price of approximately C$246.7 million. Collectively, the acquisitions represent an anticipated stabilized yield of approximately 5.1%.

Granite also announced it has extended its C$300 million term loan to December 11, 2026 and refinanced the related cross-currency interest rate swap resulting in Euro-denominated payments at a 1.355% fixed interest rate.

In addition, Granite announced that it has completed the acquisition of the development property in Dallas, Texas that it had contractually committed to acquire. Further, on December 4,2019, Granite completed the disposition of its five western Michigan assets that were held for sale for gross proceeds of US$29.5 million.

Kevan Gorrie, Granite’s President and CEO, commented that, “consistent with our strategy of acquiring and developing modern e-commerce and distribution facilities in Granite’s target markets, we expect these acquisitions to further enhance the quality of our portfolio, deliver stable and growing cash flow and generate net asset value growth. Further, as evidenced by the recent refinancing outlined herein, we continue to leverage our unique access to lower cost Euro-denominated debt to enhance our returns and cash flow. Following these commitments, we estimate our pro forma liquidity to be approximately C$650 million.”

330 & 440 E. Stateline Rd., Southaven, Mississippi, USA

Granite has acquired 330 & 440 E. Stateline Road, two multi-tenant modern distribution buildings totaling 1.7 million SF, featuring 32’ clear height and situated on 95 acres of land in Southaven, Mississippi for US$87.9 million. Constructed in 2005 and 2007, the properties are 81% leased to established tenants for a remaining weighted average lease term of 5.6 years. The acquisition closed on December 19, 2019.

The properties are located within 2.0 miles of Memphis International Airport, the world’s busiest cargo airport and home to the FedEx World Hub and UPS Airport Facility. The properties benefit from superior access to Interstate 55, Interstate 22 and the BNSF Memphis Intermodal Facility.

De Kroonstraat 1 (Tilburg), Francis Baconstraat 4 (Ede), Oude Graaf 15 (Weert)

Granite has agreed to acquire three state-of-the-art facilities in the Netherlands for approximately €89 million. Currently under construction, the properties will be delivered mid-2020, with the 488,000 SF Tilburg property being delivered in two phases, including a 142,000 SF second phase to be delivered in the first quarter of 2021. The properties have a combined leasable floor area of approximately 852,000 SF and include approximately 1.8 acres of additional land for potential future expansion. The properties are 100% leased to three prominent European tenants for a weighted average lease term of approximately 11 years.

In line with Granite’s European strategy, the properties are located in highly-desirable distribution nodes along the main supply corridor from Rotterdam, Europe’s largest port, to Germany and continental Europe. Furthermore, the assets are situated in one of the most densely populated areas in Europe, making them attractive e-commerce locations. The design of these build-to-suit properties incorporates several sustainability features, leading management to expect the properties to receive a BREEAM “Very Good” certification.

Extension of $300M term loan and refinancing of related cross-currency interest rate swap

On November 27, 2019, Granite extended its C$300 million term loan (the “Term Loan”) and refinanced the related cross-currency interest rate swap (the “Euro Swap”). The Term Loan, with an original maturity date of December 12, 2025, has been extended for one year, on the same terms, to December 11, 2026. Concurrently, the previously existing Euro Swap was terminated and Granite entered into a new seven-year cross-currency interest rate swap resulting in Euro-denominated payments at a 1.355% fixed interest rate, approximately 85 basis points lower than the previous rate. The refinancing is expected to result in interest expense savings of approximately C$2.3 million, or C$0.04 of funds from operations per unit, annually.

1301 Chalk Hill Road, Dallas, Texas

On November 19, 2019, Granite acquired 1301 Chalk Hill Road, a state-of-the-art, 2.3 million SF, multi-level e-commerce fulfillment centre, situated on 101 acres of land in Dallas, Texas. The newly constructed property is 100% leased to a leading global e-commerce provider for an initial lease term of 20 years. The previously-announced acquisition closed on November 19, 2019.

The completed acquisitions were funded using cash on hand and the acquisition of the European properties will be funded from Granite’s available liquidity.

About Granite

Granite is a Canadian-based REIT engaged in the acquisition, development, ownership and management of industrial, warehouse and logistics properties in North America and Europe. Granite owns over 90 rental income properties representing approximately 40 million square feet of leasable area.

Other Information

Copies of financial data and other publicly filed documents about Granite are available through the internet on the Canadian Securities Administrators’ Systems for Electronic Document Analysis and Retrieval (SEDAR) which can be accessed at www.sedar.com and on the United States Securities and Exchange Commission’s Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis and Retrieval System (EDGAR) which can be accessed at www.sec.gov.

For further information, please see our website at www.granitereit.com or contact Teresa Neto, Chief Financial Officer, at 647-925-7560 or Andrea Sanelli, Manager, Legal & Investor Services, at 647-925-7504.

Forward Looking Statements

This press release may contain statements that, to the extent they are not recitations of historical fact, constitute “forward-looking statements” or “forward-looking information” within the meaning of applicable securities legislation, including the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended, the United States Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and applicable Canadian securities legislation. Forward-looking statements and forward-looking information may include, among others, statements regarding the expected timing of the closing of the European acquisitions, the expected stabilized yield of the Mississippi and European acquisitions and impact of such acquisitions on Granite’s cash flow and net asset value growth, the expected impact of the extension of the Term Loan and refinancing of the Euro Swap on Granite’s liquidity and interest expense obligations, the expected BREEAM certification of the European acquisition properties, Granite’s intention and ability to make future investments and acquisitions and Granite’s plans, goals, strategies, intentions, beliefs, estimates, costs, objectives, economic performance, expectations, or foresight or the assumptions underlying any of the foregoing. Words such as “may”, “would”, “could”, “will”, “likely”, “expect”, “anticipate”, “believe”, “intend”, “plan”, “forecast”, “project”, “estimate”, “seek”, “objective” and similar expressions are used to identify forward-looking statements and forward-looking information. Forward-looking statements and forward-looking information should not be read as guarantees of the closing of the European acquisitions, the expected stabilized yield of the Mississippi and European acquisitions and impact of such acquisitions on Granite’s cash flow and net asset value growth, the expected impact of the extension of the Term Loan and refinancing of the Euro Swap on Granite’s liquidity and interest expense obligations, the expected BREEAM certification of the European acquisition properties, Granite’s intention and ability to make future investments and acquisitions or other events, performance or results and will not necessarily be accurate indications of whether or the times at or by which such impact of the acquisitions or other events or performance will be achieved. Undue reliance should not be placed on such statements. Forward-looking statements and forward-looking information are based on information available at the time and/or management’s good faith assumptions and analyses made in light of its perception of historical trends, current conditions and expected future developments, as well as other factors management believes are appropriate in the circumstances, and are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other unpredictable factors, many of which are beyond Granite’s control, that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from such forward-looking statements and forward-looking information. Important factors that could cause such differences include, but are not limited to, the risks set forth in the annual information form of Granite Real Estate Investment Trust and Granite REIT Inc. dated March 6, 2019 (the “Annual Information Form”). The “Risk Factors” section of the Annual Information Form also contains information about the material factors or assumptions underlying such forward-looking statements and forward-looking information. Forward-looking statements and forward-looking information speak only as of the date the statements and information were made and unless otherwise required by applicable securities laws, Granite expressly disclaims any intention and undertakes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements or forward-looking information contained in this press release to reflect subsequent information, events or circumstances or otherwise.

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Contacts

Teresa Neto, Chief Financial Officer
647-925-7560
or
Andrea Sanelli, Manager, Legal & Investor Services
647-925-7504.

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Growth in Halal investing gives Muslims opportunity align investments with values – Investment Executive

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Najar says the main driver for his investment decisions is religious.

“I cannot do the other way, it’s just impossible. Even if there is money to be made I cannot make it that way,” he said from Vancouver.

The money he invests must do no harm and be beneficial for society. Usaries are forbidden because the Qur’an says Muslims aren’t allowed to profit from lending money, so earning interest from an individual or bank is prohibited.

Socially responsible investing, including those based on religious beliefs, is a growing trend in Canada with assets under management surging to $3.2 trillion last year, up from $2.1 trillion in 2017, according to the Canadian Responsible Investment Trends Report.

Responsible investing represents nearly 62% of Canada’s investment industry, up from 50.6% two years ago.

Investing based on religious values remains a small but growing subsection of this trend.

Like all investing, those who make decisions based on their faith should educate themselves and find a trusted financial adviser, said Najar.

That’s especially crucial for Halal investing because most financial advisers are not familiar with the detailed web of options and restrictions, said Jesse Reitberger, co-founder of Canadian Islamic Wealth, who guides Najar’s moves.

Reitberger has focused on helping the Muslim community to adhere to financial tenets of the Qur’an since converting to Islam in 2014.

He said many Muslims have sat on the sidelines or invested and just plead ignorance.

“They just keep their money either sitting in a chequing account or under their mattress at home,” he said from Winnipeg.

For many Muslims, especially older generations, that’s meant saving cash to make purchases of real estate, cars or gold.

Canada’s Muslim population exceeds one million and is expected to become the second-largest religion by 2030.

Finding investments that are Islamic compliant can be a challenge because Canada is an interest-based economy, said Reitberger.

The Dow Jones Islamic Index and S&P/TSX 60 Shariah contain several funds that hold permissible investments.

Other faiths have taken similar steps to investing, albeit without any prohibition on debt.

The Mennonite Savings and Credit Union was formed 56 years ago to allow members to “see mutual aid put into faithful practice.”

It created a family of socially responsible funds to help investors bridge the gap between their principles and the way they invest their money.

Renamed the Kindred Credit Union in 2016 to broaden its reach, about 70% of its 25,000 members have a faith-based affiliation.

“People have taken a really big interest in this simply because it allows them to align all aspects of their lives to reflect their beliefs including their finances,” said Tim Fox, director of wealth and investments.

Screens are put in place to exclude investments in alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, gambling, military and weapons, along with those that have negative impacts on human rights, employees and animal welfare.

“Those screens continue to evolve as a social awareness evolves. As a community, as a society we decide what is important and what we’re willing to invest in and not invest in.”

Kitchener, Ont.-based Meritas Financial was created early on because there were very few options available, added Kindred CEO Ian Thomas. Meritas Financial, a mutual fund company, merged with Qtrade Financial Management Inc. in 2010.

“Over the last two decades, with acceleration over the last 10 years, all of a sudden values or socially responsible investing or responsible investing has really come to the forefront and the outcome has become more mainstream.”

Other financial institutions that provide faith-inspired options include Khalsa Credit Union. It helps British Columbia’s Sikh community while Edmonton’s Christian Credit Union applies “Christian values to financial services.”

Companies such as Wealthsimple and Manzil have sprung up in recent years to fill in gaps for the Muslim community.

Online investment firm Wealthsimple said it is preparing to launch its Shariah-compliant ETF as early as next month to replace its current offering of 50 stocks.

It will contain more than 150 stocks and increased diversification.

“One of the problems that Shariah investors have is you end up screening out entire industries from how they can invest,” chief investment officer Ben Reeves said in an interview.

He said Shariah-compliant funds can generate similar returns to regular investment vehicles, noting that its current offering, launched in 2017, has returned about six per cent annually.

Mohamad Sawwaf, co-founder and CEO of Toronto-based Islamic finance company Manzil, created its own diversified portfolio offering — Manzil Halal Portfolios — in partnership with CI Direct Investing, the roboadviser arm of CI Financial Inc.

The portfolio includes alternatives to fixed income like Islamic mortgages that are based on real and hard assets. Meanwhile, New York-base Wahed Invest LLC offers an ETF that invests in Shariah compliant stocks.

“This is a very underserved community and this is about financial inclusion because they’re currently excluded within the Canadian marketplace,” said Sawwaf.

Sawwaf said market research has indicated that more than 70% of Muslim Canadians would adopt Halal investing if products are available.

That’s particularly true of younger Muslims who are more interested in investing than older generations.

Restrictions on fixed income end up helping investors to do well, added Sameer Azam, investment adviser at RBC Wealth Management.

“A lot of the criteria pushes you to companies with lower leverage so at the end of the day we see a lot of quality in our clients’ portfolio,” he said.

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Halal investing gives Muslims opportunity to make money in line with religious values – BNN

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TORONTO — Ahmed Najar only started investing two years ago after discovering a way to do so that aligns with his Muslim values.

The 36-year-old lab researcher turned to Halal investing that screens out forbidden investments such as pork, alcohol, tobacco, weapons, adult entertainment and the biggest no-no of all: debt, bonds or interest.

Najar says the main driver for his investment decisions is religious.

“I cannot do the other way, it’s just impossible. Even if there is money to be made I cannot make it that way,” he said from Vancouver.

The money he invests must do no harm and be beneficial for society. Usaries are forbidden because the Qur’an says Muslims aren’t allowed to profit from lending money, so earning interest from an individual or bank is prohibited.

Socially responsible investing, including those based on religious beliefs, is a growing trend in Canada with assets under management surging to $3.2 trillion last year, up from $2.1 trillion in 2017, according to the Canadian Responsible Investment Trends Report.

The rise of ESG investing

Paul Harris, partner and portfolio manager at Harris Douglas Asset Management, talks about the challenges ahead for companies and money managers as climate change and ESG investing move to the forefront of the investment world.

Responsible investing represents nearly 62 per cent of Canada’s investment industry, up from 50.6 per cent two years ago.

Investing based on religious values remains a small but growing subsection of this trend.

Like all investing, those who make decisions based on their faith should educate themselves and find a trusted financial adviser, said Najar.

That’s especially crucial for Halal investing because most financial advisers are not familiar with the detailed web of options and restrictions, said Jesse Reitberger, co-founder of Canadian Islamic Wealth, who guides Najar’s moves.

Reitberger has focused on helping the Muslim community to adhere to financial tenets of the Qur’an since converting to Islam in 2014.

He said many Muslims have sat on the sidelines or invested and just plead ignorance.

“They just keep their money either sitting in a chequing account or under their mattress at home,” he said from Winnipeg.

For many Muslims, especially older generations, that’s meant saving cash to make purchases of real estate, cars or gold.

Canada’s Muslim population exceeds one million and is expected to become the second-largest religion by 2030.

Finding investments that are Islamic compliant can be a challenge because Canada is an interest-based economy, said Reitberger.

The Dow Jones Islamic Index and S&P/TSX 60 Shariah contain several funds that hold permissible investments.

Other faiths have taken similar steps to investing, albeit without any prohibition on debt.

The Mennonite Savings and Credit Union was formed 56 years ago to allow members to “see mutual aid put into faithful practice.”

It created a family of socially responsible funds to help investors bridge the gap between their principles and the way they invest their money.

Renamed Kindred Credit Union in 2016 to broaden its reach, about 70 per cent of its 25,000 members have a faith-based affiliation.

“People have taken a really big interest in this simply because it allows them to align all aspects of their lives to reflect their beliefs including their finances,” said Tim Fox, director of wealth and investments.

Screens are put in place to exclude investments in alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, gambling, military and weapons, along with those that have negative impacts on human rights, employees and animal welfare.

“Those screens continue to evolve as a social awareness evolves. As a community, as a society we decide what is important and what we’re willing to invest in and not invest in.”

Kitchener, Ont.-based Meritas Financial was created early on because there were very few options available, added Kindred CEO Ian Thomas.

“Over the last two decades, with acceleration over the last 10 years, all of a sudden values or socially responsible investing or responsible investing has really come to the forefront and the outcome has become more mainstream.”

Other financial institutions that provide faith-inspired options include Khalsa Credit Union. It helps British Columbia’s Sikh community while Edmonton’s Christian Credit Union applies “Christian values to financial services.”

Companies such as Wealthsimple and Manzil have sprung up in recent years to fill in gaps for the Muslim community.

Online investment firm Wealthsimple said it is preparing to launch its Shariah-compliant ETF as early as next month to replace its current offering of 50 stocks.

It will contain more than 150 stocks and increased diversification.

“One of the problems that Shariah investors have is you end up screening out entire industries from how they can invest,” chief investment officer Ben Reeves said in an interview.

He said Shariah-compliant funds can generate similar returns to regular investment vehicles, noting that Its current offering launched in 2017 has returned about six per cent annually.

Mohamad Sawwaf, co-founder and CEO of Toronto-based Islamic finance company Manzil, created its own diversified portfolio offering — Manzil Halal Portfolios — in partnership with CI Direct Investing, the roboadviser arm of CI Financial Inc.

The portfolio includes alternatives to fixed income like Islamic mortgages that are based on real and hard assets, while Wahed Invest’s ETF invests in Shariah compliant stocks.

“This is a very underserved community and this is about financial inclusion because they’re currently excluded within the Canadian marketplace,” he said.

Sawwaf said market research has indicated that more than 70 per cent of Muslim Canadians would adopt Halal investing if products are available.

That’s particularly true of younger Muslims who are more interested in investing than older generations.

Restrictions on fixed income end up helping investors to do well, added Sameer Azam, investment adviser at RBC Wealth Management.

“A lot of the criteria pushes you to companies with lower leverage so at the end of the day we see a lot of quality in our clients portfolio,” he said.
 

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Halal investing gives Muslims opportunity to make money in line with religious values – OrilliaMatters

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TORONTO — Ahmed Najar only started investing two years ago after discovering a way to do so that aligns with his Muslim values.

The 36-year-old lab researcher turned to Halal investing that screens out forbidden investments such as pork, alcohol, tobacco, weapons, adult entertainment and the biggest no-no of all: debt, bonds or interest.

Najar says the main driver for his investment decisions is religious.

“I cannot do the other way, it’s just impossible. Even if there is money to be made I cannot make it that way,” he said from Vancouver.

The money he invests must do no harm and be beneficial for society. Usaries are forbidden because the Qur’an says Muslims aren’t allowed to profit from lending money, so earning interest from an individual or bank is prohibited.

Socially responsible investing, including those based on religious beliefs, is a growing trend in Canada with assets under management surging to $3.2 trillion last year, up from $2.1 trillion in 2017, according to the Canadian Responsible Investment Trends Report.

Responsible investing represents nearly 62 per cent of Canada’s investment industry, up from 50.6 per cent two years ago.

Investing based on religious values remains a small but growing subsection of this trend.

Like all investing, those who make decisions based on their faith should educate themselves and find a trusted financial adviser, said Najar.

That’s especially crucial for Halal investing because most financial advisers are not familiar with the detailed web of options and restrictions, said Jesse Reitberger, co-founder of Canadian Islamic Wealth, who guides Najar’s moves.

Reitberger has focused on helping the Muslim community to adhere to financial tenets of the Qur’an since converting to Islam in 2014.

He said many Muslims have sat on the sidelines or invested and just plead ignorance.

“They just keep their money either sitting in a chequing account or under their mattress at home,” he said from Winnipeg.

For many Muslims, especially older generations, that’s meant saving cash to make purchases of real estate, cars or gold.

Canada’s Muslim population exceeds one million and is expected to become the second-largest religion by 2030.

Finding investments that are Islamic compliant can be a challenge because Canada is an interest-based economy, said Reitberger.

The Dow Jones Islamic Index and S&P/TSX 60 Shariah contain several funds that hold permissible investments.

Other faiths have taken similar steps to investing, albeit without any prohibition on debt.

The Mennonite Savings and Credit Union was formed 56 years ago to allow members to “see mutual aid put into faithful practice.” 

It created a family of socially responsible funds to help investors bridge the gap between their principles and the way they invest their money. 

Renamed Kindred Credit Union in 2016 to broaden its reach, about 70 per cent of its 25,000 members have a faith-based affiliation.

“People have taken a really big interest in this simply because it allows them to align all aspects of their lives to reflect their beliefs including their finances,” said Tim Fox, director of wealth and investments.

Screens are put in place to exclude investments in alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, gambling, military and weapons, along with those that have negative impacts on human rights, employees and animal welfare.

“Those screens continue to evolve as a social awareness evolves. As a community, as a society we decide what is important and what we’re willing to invest in and not invest in.”

Kitchener, Ont.-based Meritas Financial was created early on because there were very few options available, added Kindred CEO Ian Thomas.

“Over the last two decades, with acceleration over the last 10 years, all of a sudden values or socially responsible investing or responsible investing has really come to the forefront and the outcome has become more mainstream.”

Other financial institutions that provide faith-inspired options include Khalsa Credit Union. It helps British Columbia’s Sikh community while Edmonton’s Christian Credit Union applies “Christian values to financial services.”

Companies such as Wealthsimple and Manzil have sprung up in recent years to fill in gaps for the Muslim community.

Online investment firm Wealthsimple said it is preparing to launch its Shariah-compliant ETF as early as next month to replace its current offering of 50 stocks.

It will contain more than 150 stocks and increased diversification.

“One of the problems that Shariah investors have is you end up screening out entire industries from how they can invest,” chief investment officer Ben Reeves said in an interview.

He said Shariah-compliant funds can generate similar returns to regular investment vehicles, noting that Its current offering launched in 2017 has returned about six per cent annually.

Mohamad Sawwaf, co-founder and CEO of Toronto-based Islamic finance company Manzil, created its own diversified portfolio offering — Manzil Halal Portfolios — in partnership with CI Direct Investing, the roboadviser arm of CI Financial Inc.

The portfolio includes alternatives to fixed income like Islamic mortgages that are based on real and hard assets, while Wahed Invest’s ETF invests in Shariah compliant stocks.

“This is a very underserved community and this is about financial inclusion because they’re currently excluded within the Canadian marketplace,” he said.

Sawwaf said market research has indicated that more than 70 per cent of Muslim Canadians would adopt Halal investing if products are available. 

That’s particularly true of younger Muslims who are more interested in investing than older generations.

Restrictions on fixed income end up helping investors to do well, added Sameer Azam, investment adviser at RBC Wealth Management.

“A lot of the criteria pushes you to companies with lower leverage so at the end of the day we see a lot of quality in our clients portfolio,” he said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 21, 2021.

Ross Marowits, The Canadian Press

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