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Nunavut minister stripped of portfolios says he does not regret social media post

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IQALUIT, Nunavut — Nunavut’s former housing minister says he does not regret making a Facebook post about the Black Lives Matter movement that saw him stripped of his cabinet portfolios.

A post on Patterk Netser’s Facebook page Wednesday said “All lives matter” and criticized Black women for having abortions.

Nunavut Premier Joe Savikataaq on Thursday removed Netser from his roles as housing minister and minister responsible for Nunavut Arctic College after learning of the “unacceptable social media post.”

Netser said he does not regret the post because he was practising free speech.

“I practised my freedom of speech as a Canadian citizen, which is protected in the Constitution … Our freedom of speech is just automatically taken away, little by little, and before we know it, we’re going to be a country like China or Russia,” he said in an interview with The Canadian Press.

Savikataaq said his staff brought the post to his attention and he phoned Netser and asked him to resign.

“I told him there was two options: he could either resign and, if he didn’t resign, then I would remove his portfolios. He chose the latter,” Savikataaq told The Canadian Press.

The premier said there “can be no tolerance for disrespectful, hurtful remarks or actions.”

“I was quite shocked that a post like that was posted by one of the executive council members, as part of my cabinet. It’s his own personal post, but as a member of cabinet … that is your position 24 hours a day, seven days a week.”

Malaiya Lucassie, Netser’s daughter and an Iqaluit city councillor, commented on her father’s Facebook page with her own post. She wrote that “All lives matter” and questioned why there was not a similar movement to Black Lives Matter for Indigenous people.

Lucassie later posted an apology on her own Facebook page.

“My intentions to call for change for Inuit was presented poorly, and I in no way meant to take away from the BLM movement or from any other group fighting against the systemic racism we face,” she wrote.

Iqaluit Mayor Kenny Bell said councillors are accountable to the city’s human rights and anti-harassment policy.

“Council … will take this opportunity to look at additional ways to educate council on racism, biases, and other social discrimination,” Bell said in a statement.

Netser said he believes he has a right to express his views and did not mean to target a particular group with his post.

“I support the Black Lives Matter movement. I respect them, but I was just thinking about the little babies that were aborted and that have been aborted,” he said.

“I respect equality, especially equal treatment of people and the current laws that are in place that support women and the right to choose. My personal views based on my religious faith differ, but those are my personal views and my personal views alone,” he added.

In a Facebook post, Nunavut’s Black History Society praised Savikataaq for “taking the hard decision to remove a cabinet member who had made insensitive comments towards our local Black Lives Matter movement, Black women and women generally.”

Netser, who represents Coral Harbour and Naujaat, was first elected to the territory’s legislative assembly in 2004 and has held several cabinet portfolios in Nunavut’s consensus-style government, which has no political parties. Cabinet ministers are chosen by all elected members of the legislature and their portfolios are assigned by the premier.

Savikataaq said he will bring the matter forward when the legislative assembly reconvenes Oct. 21. Legislature members must vote on whether to remove Netser from cabinet.

“As a premier, I can remove portfolios but I cannot remove a minister. Only full caucus can remove a minister,” Savikataaq said.

That means Netser can still join cabinet meetings at this point, because he is still a minister.

In the interim, Savikataaq will act as housing minister and Education Minister David Joanasie will take on responsibility for Nunavut Arctic College.

Netser says he will respect whatever decision the assembly makes.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 8, 2020.

___

This story was produced with the financial assistance of the Facebook and Canadian press News Fellowship

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InvestorChannel's Media Watchlist Update for Thursday, October 22, 2020, 16:30 EST – InvestorIntel

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InvestorChannel’s Media Stocks Watchlist Update video includes the Top 5 Performers of the Day, and a performance review of the companies InvestorChannel is following in the sector.
Sources Include: Yahoo Finance, AlphaVantage FinnHub & CSE.
For more information, visit us at InvestorIntel.com or email us at info@investorintel.com

Watchlist Companies:
– QYOU Media Inc. (QYOU.V) CAD 0.07 (7.69%)
– Corus Entertainment Inc. (CJR-B.TO) CAD 3.38 (7.64%)
– Stingray Group Inc. (RAY-A.TO) CAD 5.60 (1.63%)
– Thunderbird Entertainment Group Inc. (TBRD.V) CAD 2.09 (1.46%)
– Zoom Video Communications Inc. (ZM) USD 520.54 (1.43%)
– HubSpot, Inc. (HUBS) USD 309.24 (0.38%)
– Glacier Media Inc. (GVC.TO) CAD 0.20 (0.0%)
– GVIC Communications Corp. (GCT.TO) CAD 0.14 (0.0%)
– Media Central Corporation Inc. (FLYY.CN) CAD 0.01 (0.0%)
– Moovly Media Inc. (MVY.V) CAD 0.07 (0.0%)
– Network Media Group Inc. (NTE.V) CAD 0.14 (0.0%)
– Quizam Media Corporation (QQ.CN) CAD 0.50 (0.0%)
– WOW! Unlimited Media Inc. (WOW.V) CAD 0.35 (0.0%)
– ZoomerMedia Limited (ZUM.V) CAD 0.06 (0.0%)
– Slack Technologies Inc. (WORK) USD 28.62 (-0.87%)
– Adobe Inc. (ADBE) USD 483.60 (-2.49%)
– Wix.com Ltd. (WIX) USD 264.16 (-2.72%)
– MediaValet Inc. (MVP.V) CAD 2.41 (-5.49%)
– Lingo Media Corporation (LM.V) CAD 0.09 (-5.56%)
– Postmedia Network Canada Corp. (PNC-A.TO) CAD 1.57 (-8.19%)

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National media calling for level playing field with Google, Facebook – Agassiz-Harrison Observer

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Black Press Media has joined Canada’s news media publishers in calling for all political parties in Parliament to support the adoption of Australia’s approach to combat the monopolistic practices of Google and Facebook.

The two American web giants control the lion’s share of online advertising dollars and distribute newspaper content without compensation in Canada, as in democracies around the world. The model being implemented in Australia counters these monopolistic practices and levels the digital playing field – at no cost to taxpayers and without user fees or other charges.

In Canada, Google and Facebook control 80 per cent of all online advertising revenues. They use their monopoly control not just to divert advertising from news media publishers, but also to divert millions in advertising revenue that they place on news media sites. Even when advertisers pay specifically to advertise on news media sites, Google and Facebook keep most of that revenue, while gathering and using data on news media site readers and advertisers for their own purposes.

Black Press Media CEO Rick O’Connor stated, “It is vital that we establish the principle that the content we produce and that is subsequently picked up and carried on the platforms such as Google and Facebook should be compensated by the platforms so that we can continue to provide the journalism that our local communities want.

“This is a principle that is only recently being accepted by the platforms, thus the need to work in concert with the rest of the industry to fight for local journalism.”

The recommendation that Canada adopt the Australian model is contained in Levelling the Digital Playing Field, a report commissioned by News Media Canada and prepared by global advisory firm FTI Consulting, which conducted an in-depth analysis of actions taken in democracies around the world to address the same challenge.

News Media Canada represents more than 90 per cent of news media readership in Canada including daily, regional, community, and ethnocultural news publications.

“A strong, diverse and independent news media is valued by Canadians and crucial to our democracy,” said Jamie Irving, vice-president of New Brunswick news publishing company BNI and Chair of News Media Canada’s working group.

“Publishing real news costs money, and Google and Facebook – two of the biggest companies in the world – cannot continue to be allowed to free-ride on the backs of Canadian news media publishers who produce news content, without fair compensation. The time to tackle the global web giants, as the federal government indicated in September, is now.”

Key elements of the Australian model include:

  • An effective approach that requires no new government funding, consumer taxes, or user fees.
  • Publishers, with the approval of government, form a collective bargaining unit to negotiate compensation for the use of their content and intellectual property. It is only through this government approved collective approach that the immense monopoly power of the web giants can be countered, and the digital playing field levelled.
  • A code of conduct to ensure that the web monopolies do not use new algorithms and other proprietary technology to expand their market domination and entrench unfair competitive practices.
  • Enforcement. Under the Australia model, the web giants are subject to fines in the hundreds of millions of dollars for a single infraction. Penalties of this scale are the only effective ways to rein in companies of this unprecedented size and power.
  • Comparable context. Both Canada and Australia publishers are facing significant challenges from the web giants. Canada and Australia share strong regional identities, and similar parliamentary and legal systems.

The government of Canada announced in its speech from the throne on Sept. 23, “The government will act to ensure their revenue is shared more fairly with our creators and media, and will also require them to contribute to the creation, production and distribution of our stories, on screen, in lyrics, in music and in writing.”

News Media Canada is calling on the government to tackle the web giants and adopt the Australian model in Canada.

The CEO members of the following companies are leading the discussions with the government of Canada including Glacier Media, Black Press, Torstar, Postmedia, Globe and Mail, La Presse, Quebecor and Brunswick News.

Canadian-owned Black Press operates more than 80 print and website publications in B.C., Alberta and the Yukon.

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National media calling for level playing field with Google, Facebook

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Black Press Media has joined Canada’s news media publishers in calling for all political parties in Parliament to support the adoption of Australia’s approach to combat the monopolistic practices of Google and Facebook.

The two American web giants control the lion’s share of online advertising dollars and distribute newspaper content without compensation in Canada, as in democracies around the world. The model being implemented in Australia counters these monopolistic practices and levels the digital playing field – at no cost to taxpayers and without user fees or other charges.

In Canada, Google and Facebook control 80 per cent of all online advertising revenues. They use their monopoly control not just to divert advertising from news media publishers, but also to divert millions in advertising revenue that they place on news media sites. Even when advertisers pay specifically to advertise on news media sites, Google and Facebook keep most of that revenue, while gathering and using data on news media site readers and advertisers for their own purposes.

Black Press Media CEO Rick O’Connor stated, “It is vital that we establish the principle that the content we produce and that is subsequently picked up and carried on the platforms such as Google and Facebook should be compensated by the platforms so that we can continue to provide the journalism that our local communities want.

“This is a principle that is only recently being accepted by the platforms, thus the need to work in concert with the rest of the industry to fight for local journalism.”

The recommendation that Canada adopt the Australian model is contained in Levelling the Digital Playing Field, a report commissioned by News Media Canada and prepared by global advisory firm FTI Consulting, which conducted an in-depth analysis of actions taken in democracies around the world to address the same challenge.

News Media Canada represents more than 90 per cent of news media readership in Canada including daily, regional, community, and ethnocultural news publications.

“A strong, diverse and independent news media is valued by Canadians and crucial to our democracy,” said Jamie Irving, vice-president of New Brunswick news publishing company BNI and Chair of News Media Canada’s working group.

“Publishing real news costs money, and Google and Facebook – two of the biggest companies in the world – cannot continue to be allowed to free-ride on the backs of Canadian news media publishers who produce news content, without fair compensation. The time to tackle the global web giants, as the federal government indicated in September, is now.”

Key elements of the Australian model include:

  • An effective approach that requires no new government funding, consumer taxes, or user fees.
  • Publishers, with the approval of government, form a collective bargaining unit to negotiate compensation for the use of their content and intellectual property. It is only through this government approved collective approach that the immense monopoly power of the web giants can be countered, and the digital playing field levelled.
  • A code of conduct to ensure that the web monopolies do not use new algorithms and other proprietary technology to expand their market domination and entrench unfair competitive practices.
  • Enforcement. Under the Australia model, the web giants are subject to fines in the hundreds of millions of dollars for a single infraction. Penalties of this scale are the only effective ways to rein in companies of this unprecedented size and power.
  • Comparable context. Both Canada and Australia publishers are facing significant challenges from the web giants. Canada and Australia share strong regional identities, and similar parliamentary and legal systems.

The government of Canada announced in its speech from the throne on Sept. 23, “The government will act to ensure their revenue is shared more fairly with our creators and media, and will also require them to contribute to the creation, production and distribution of our stories, on screen, in lyrics, in music and in writing.”

News Media Canada is calling on the government to tackle the web giants and adopt the Australian model in Canada.

The CEO members of the following companies are leading the discussions with the government of Canada including Glacier Media, Black Press, Torstar, Postmedia, Globe and Mail, La Presse, Quebecor and Brunswick News.

Canadian-owned Black Press operates more than 80 print and website publications in B.C., Alberta and the Yukon.

Source: – Kelowna Capital News

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