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Tainted water, Canadian ISIS prisoners, money laundering: Global News investigates 2019 – Global News

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From a groundbreaking investigation into the safety of drinking water to Canadians held in ISIS detainee camps in Syria to exposing Canada’s money laundering problem, Global News took an in-depth look at a wide range of issues in 2019 that sparked public conversation and led to government action.

Tainted water

In November, Global News, along with universities and 10 media organizations, began publishing a series of stories that revealed hundreds of thousands of Canadians could be consuming tap water laced with high levels of lead leaching from aging infrastructure and plumbing.

READ MORE: Quebec to review how it tests drinking water following investigative report

Reporters collected test results that measured exposure to lead in 11 cities across Canada and found out of 12,000 tests since 2014, 33 per cent exceeded the national safety guideline of five parts per billion. The reporting also found the drinking in schools and daycares in several cities were exposed to dangerous lead levels.

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News outlets around the world picked up on the Tainted Water investigation and led to changes among municipal and provincial governments.

Return to Syria






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Canadian woman detained in Syria says she accepts she could face prosecution


Canadian woman detained in Syria says she accepts she could face prosecution

Amid the fall of the so-called Islamic State, Global News returned to Syria this year to continue its reporting on the issue of Canadian foreign fighters.

At the Al-Hawl camp, which houses more than 70,000 women and children captured during the final battles with ISIS, Global spoke with several Canadians who are asking for the government to bring them home to be tried under Canada’s justice system.

READ MORE: Kurdish forces struggle to contain world’s unwanted ISIS prisoners in Syria

Canada has so far not repatriated any of the roughly 40 Canadians held at ISIS detainee camps, according to Kurdish authorities.

Canada’s broken recycling industry

In a months-long investigation for a multi-part series, Global News spoke with dozens of communities, companies and industry leaders across the country about the mounting challenges faced by Canada’s recycling industry.

READ MORE: Is Canada’s recycling industry broken?

The result is dire: with few exceptions, more recycling is being sent to landfills, fewer items are being accepted in the blue bin and the financial toll of running these programs has become a burden for some municipalities.

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Reporters also explored how to fix the country’s recycling system by focusing on a system in B.C. that relies on private companies to carry out the province’s residential recycling program.

Following the money, again

On the heels of Global’s months-long investigation into Fentanyl trafficking in 2018, reporters continued to dig into the intersection of drugs and money laundering in B.C., which looked at a then-Liberal MP whose work at a law firm has been linked to financial transactions with an alleged Chinese organized crime figure.

In the series B.C. Casino Diaries, former casino employees who worked for Great Canadian Gaming in Richmond, B.C., revealed how organized crime first infiltrated the gaming industry.

READ MORE: Whistleblower warned B.C. casino in 2000 of alleged ‘co-operation with organized crime’

Global also revealed how Liberal MP Joe Peschisolido’s law firm helped facilitate a secretive B.C. real estate deal — known as a “bare trust” deal — that helped an alleged Chinese “drug boss” hide his ownership stake in a $7.8 million condo development.

And in a national look at the problem of money laundering, Global revealed how the provinces largely fail to prosecute these complex crimes with just 321 guilty verdicts in money-laundering cases over a 16-year period.

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Following media reports on the money laundering, B.C. announced it would launch a public inquiry that has distorted the province’s real estate market and fuelled the opioid crisis.

Justice denied

Global News compiled a database to track the number of criminal cases thrown out in the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s R. v. Jordan decision in 2016, which set trial deadlines of 18 months for provincial court trials and 30 months in superior court.

We found nearly 800 criminal cases — ranging from manslaughter to drug trafficking and even murder — have been stayed because a judge found the defendant’s constitutional right to a timely trial had been violated.

READ MORE: Almost half of Edmonton criminal cases ultimately withdrawn

Global Edmonton followed the story with a look at charges being tossed in Alberta over a lack of prosecutors. Data obtained by Global News from Alberta Justice shows that all charges in 47 per cent of cases were withdrawn in the last fiscal year, and that number has been steadily rising since the 2015-2016 fiscal year

Immigration Refugee Board conduct

In 2019, Global reporters continued their in-depth coverage of Canada’s immigration system, exposing the ways in which Canada’s refugee determination system is failing some of the most vulnerable claimants.

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READ MORE: Refugee judge asks woman why her husband wouldn’t ‘just kill’ her

This included claims that refugee judges at the Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB) do not always adhere to the guidelines in cases involving allegations of sexual assault and domestic abuse.

Reporting also revealed problems with the board’s process for hiring new judges, including the re-appointment of a former adjudicator who publicly declared that nearly all refugee claimants are liars.

For the good of the force

In January, Global began publishing an ongoing series of stories exploring the RCMP’s “culture of dysfunction” and the way in which the famous force’s indelible image has shielded it from scandal.

READ MORE: Meet the Mounties who allege the RCMP used their disabilities to force them out

The initial four-part series combed through decades worth of public documents to estimate the cost of the force’s failure to reform at $220 million and counting, revisited the case of the first female Mountie to win a sexual harassment lawsuit against the force, and probed the probable impacts of the City of Surrey’s decision to ditch the Mounties.

Those stories paved the way for additional deep dives exploring racism in the ranks, the force’s alleged campaign to get rid of Mounties with disabilities and its second $100 million sexual harassment settlement.

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Broken series

Beginning in November, Global launched Broken, a series reflecting on how we must provide better, more consistent and nuanced coverage of any woman, trans or non-binary person who has experienced violence, abuse or harassment.

READ MORE: Shelters on the front lines help women flee violence — but they’re also in crisis

Reporters tackled a multitude of complicated societal issues that aren’t often explored at length. They probed everything from the rehabilitation of domestic abusers to women of colour’s unique experience of violence and the 30-year lag time for a mainstream conversation about feminism after the Ecole Polytechnique massacre.

These stories are just the beginning, having sparked many people to reach out with their own stories of harassment, abuse and injustice, which reporters are now beginning to investigate.

Inside Ontario’s rocky first year of legal weed 

Ontario has taken perhaps the clumsiest approach of any province to cannabis legalization; unfortunately, with 40 per cent of Canada’s population, that has an outsized effect on the national cannabis economy. The province still has only one store for more than half a million people and has Canada’s second-lowest per capita cannabis sales.

READ MORE: Ontario spent at least $10 million on cannabis stores that never opened

Through the use of freedom of information requests, Global exposed the province’s secret pot warehouse, discovering that the OCS was selling cannabis buyers’ postal code data despite its privacy policy, reporting on how much taxpayers spent to not open the public-sector cannabis stores that were originally planned — over $10 million — and explaining the bizarre outcomes of the province’s decision to assign store licenses by lottery. (One winning property was entered over 173 times.)

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‘Under the Influence’

In a four-part series, reporters looked at the pharmaceutical industry’s influence on Canada’s health-care system — swaying doctors’ opinions, funding medical schools and, ultimately, affecting the type of drugs we are prescribed.

READ MORE: Big pharma paid $151M to doctors, hospitals in 2017-18, but we don’t know who got paid or why

Global News spent months talking to doctors, opioid experts, pharma reps and Canadians whose lives were forever changed by prescription drugs. Reporters obtained and analyzed documents showing millions of dollars poured into health-care industries by Big Pharma.

Read Part 1Part 2Part 3 and Part 4

Questionable conduct in Ontario real-estate 






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Ajax property entrepreneur Tarekh Rana haunted by Bangladesh fugitive crime boss doppelganger


Ajax property entrepreneur Tarekh Rana haunted by Bangladesh fugitive crime boss doppelganger

An investigation between Global News and Bangladesh’s The Daily Star newspaper has found striking similarities between a Durham developer and an international fugitive accused of leading a criminal organization behind a series of extortions and murders.

READ MORE: Tarekh Rana is an acclaimed Ajax businessman. Is he also a fugitive crime boss?

The investigation also revealed his business appears to be in disarray and revealed how Rana aligned himself with city council in Ajax, even making a sitting councillor a director of his company.

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In April, Global revealed that a company, 1PLUS12, is currently facing two lawsuits totaling $6.4 million that allege fraud or misrepresentation and is linked to an alleged $17-million mortgage fraud involving high-end real estate across Toronto.

One of their consultants, who recently changed his name, is also behind a B.C. company, that according to claims in court documents, lost investors and creditors almost $19 million.

Local investigations:

Nova Scotia

Construction industry safety

During the summer, Global News used unmarked vehicles to film several Halifax-area construction sites, capturing on tape what appeared to be a wide variety of health and safety concerns. Four independent sources with expertise in construction safety reviewed that footage and alleged it contained life-threatening risk to workers, as labourers toiled on balconies and rooftops with no fall protection, among other risks.

READ MORE: Sources identify ‘huge risk’ on Nova Scotia construction sites

When the Nova Scotia Department of Labour received a copy of the tape, it inspected more than 20 construction sites in the region, many of which were featured in Global News’ investigation. Three sites were issued warnings for not operating safely.

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CODE ZERO

In December, Global took an in-depth look at the rise in temporary emergency room closures as Nova Scotia deals with a shortage of doctors and nurses. Most are unscheduled and can come with as little as half a day’s notice.

Between 2014 and the first three months of 2018, just under half of the emergency rooms in the province — 18 of 37 — were forced to temporarily close, often as a result of a lack of doctors or nurses.

And the number of temporary closures is increasing dramatically, according to data collected from reports prepared by the Nova Scotia government.

Ontario

Abuse at Children’s Aid group homes






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Drugs, theft, alcohol and inappropriate relationships alleged at Children’s Aid group home


Drugs, theft, alcohol and inappropriate relationships alleged at Children’s Aid group home

In January, of this year, Global Kingston reported a story about a woman charged with sexual assaults of two minors and her employment at a Children’s Aid Society in Belleville at the time of the offences.

That story snowballed into an investigation that took six months and expanded into Prince Edward County.

READ MORE: Teen ‘sexual cult’ in Ontario foster home known to Children’s Aid Society, victim says

Three pieces came from that investigation, one about a Children’s Aid group home that might have led to the death of a young man, another about a foster home in Prince Edward County named by the children who lived there as a ‘sexual cult’ and a third about a victim who came forward about her abuse as a child in a foster home, only to be ignored.

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Soldiers aid commission

The Ontario Soldiers’ Aid Commission, the province’s emergency grant program for veterans, turns away veterans of recent conflicts while returning most of its budget unspent every year to the government, documents released under access-to-information laws show.

READ MORE: Ontario’s veterans’ fund turns younger vets away, returns money to government unspent

The provincial law it works under was last updated in 1970 and doesn’t let it give money to veterans of any conflict more recent than Korea. So while veterans of more recent wars often ask the volunteer board for help, they must be turned away. (The documents show that this happens, but the government won’t tell us how often.)

Lethbridge 

Blood Tribe opioid crisis

Amid Canada’s opioid crisis which has killed more than 14,000, Global Lethbridge took a deeper look at the effect the deadly painkiller were having in a southern Alberta community and

The Blood Tribe is the largest reserve in Canada, but carfentanil – a drug 100 times more potent than fentanyl – is killing people in record numbers and the community has made repeated, desperate calls for help that have gone unanswered.

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Manitoba






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Questionable spending at Sagkeeng FN


Questionable spending at Sagkeeng FN

Sagkeeng First Nation health care centre investigation

Global Winnipeg revealed in June that Employees at a Manitoba health centre received more than a million dollars in questionable payouts – including thousands in cash advances and extensive entertainment costs – over the course of 18 months.

READ MORE: Internal audit finds $1.3 million in questionable spending at Sagkeeng First Nation health centre

An internal audit, which reporters obtained exclusively, found that

Between Apr. 1, 2016 through Oct. 31, 2017, employees at the Fort Alexander Health Centre received more than $1.3 million above their salaries. The audit also revealed instances of $1,000 cash advances, extensive travel entertainment costs (including escape rooms, movie theatres and toy stores), and tens of thousands of dollars in “finders fees” for writing grant proposals.

Edmonton 

Calcium chloride in water

Through Freedom of Information requests, Global News uncovered documents regarding Edmonton’s calcium chloride program that were previously undisclosed to city councillors.​ The documents revealed that the anti-icing agent was more detrimental to concrete and asphalt than sodium chloride and was classified as a hazardous waste after a test from the water utility.

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READ MORE: Test reveals calcium chloride exceeds Edmonton bylaws; councillors not briefed

The stories prompted hours of debate as councillors discussed the new information and the future of the anti-icing program. Ultimately, the city paused the program for one year to assess other snow-clearing options.

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Canadian travel restrictions extended until Halloween – Canada Immigration News

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Shelby Thevenot


Shelby Thevenot

Kareem El-Assal

Kareem El-Assal


Kareem El-Assal

Published on September 28th, 2020 at 09:02pm EDT
Updated on September 28th, 2020 at 09:20pm EDT

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Canada is once again extending travel restrictions to foreign travellers as cases of coronavirus continue to rise.

A new Canadian government Order in Council states that coronavirus travel restrictions will be extended until Halloween, on October 31.

Canada initially closed its borders from March 18 to June 30. Since then travel restrictions have been rolled over on a month-by-month basis.

The border is closed to foreign travellers who are coming to Canada for a non-essential reason such as recreation, tourism, or entertainment.

Some people are exempt from travel restrictions, such as:

  • Canadian citizens (including dual citizens) or permanent residents;
  • certain people who have been approved for Canadian permanent residence;
  • certain temporary foreign workers;
  • certain international students;
  • protected persons;
  • immediate family members of Canadians; or
  • anyone else who falls under the exemptions listed on the government’s webpage.

Everyone who crosses the Canadian border must still quarantine for 14 days. The only exemptions to the mandatory quarantine requirement are:

  • crew members;
  • people invited by the health minister to help with the COVID-19 response, and other healthcare workers;
  • members of visiting forces who are coming to work;
  • people coming to receive medical services within 36 hours of their arrival;
  • crossing the border in a trans-border community;
  • people crossing into Canada aboard a “vessel” for the purposes of research, as long as they stay on the vessel; and
  • other circumstances listed in the Order in Council.

Canada has a separate order in place that has also limited cross border travel between it and the U.S. since March. This order was also extended again earlier this month.

The decision to extend Canada’s travel restrictions come as no surprise in light of the rising COVID-19 cases in Canada and abroad.

Canada was able to successfully flatten the coronavirus curve from late May until August.

However, COVID-19 cases have been steadily increasing since late August.

Canada’s largest provinces, Ontario and Quebec, have announced stricter measures in recent days to try and reduce the significantly higher levels of COVID-19 cases they have experienced over the past month.

Canada is still issuing new permanent residence invitations throughout the pandemic.

These invitations are being issued to individuals currently in Canada as well as those abroad, although the number of individuals completing their permanent residence landing in Canada is much lower than usual due to the pandemic.

In addition, the travel restrictions stipulate that only those who received their permanent residence approval prior to March 18 are currently eligible to travel to Canada.

As such, Canada’s ongoing Express Entry and Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) draws are meant in part to facilitate the arrival of immigrants in support of Canada’s economy after the pandemic.

In a speech last week, the Canadian government stated it plans to continue to welcome global talent to drive the country’s economic growth.

Two major events in October will provide more clarity on the Canadian government’s immigration plans following the pandemic.

Canada’s immigration minister Marco Mendicino has made a series of remarks throughout the pandemic suggesting that immigration will be vital to Canada’s economic recovery.

COVID 19, the Economy and Immigration with the Hon Marco Mendicino

Since 2015, Prime Minister Trudeau and the Liberal government have regularly and widely championed immigration to Canada and the welcoming of refugees. Now, …

Find out if you are eligible for Canadian immigration

© 2020 CIC News All Rights Reserved

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    Shelby Thevenot

    Editor, CIC News

    Shelby is an Editor at CIC News.

    Shelby has worked as a freelance writer, photojournalist and staff video journalist before she came to CIC News in 2019.

    She has lived in Manitoba, Alberta, B.C., and now Quebec. Her exposure to life in multiple communities across Canada
    helps her connect readers with the places where they may end up living someday.

    Helping people navigate the complex Canadian immigration system is what drives her to create new, engaging, and comprehensive content for CIC News readers.

    Talking to people with interesting stories and insights is the best part of her day. Send story ideas to shelby.thevenot@canadavisa.com.

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World must get COVID-19 under control before winter comes to Northern Hemisphere: WHO doctor – CTV News

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TORONTO —
Countries with rising COVID-19 numbers – Canada among them – must get the curve under control before hospitals are inundated with huge numbers of people battling either the novel coronavirus or winter’s seasonal sicknesses, says a doctor with the World Health Organization.

“Well, certainly the winter months are very important because that’s when other illnesses appear,” said Dr. Margaret Harris, who spoke to CTV’s Your Morning from Geneva on Monday.

“That’s the time when respiratory illnesses really love to circulate in our communities.”

That includes colds, flus, bronchitis, and pneumonia.

The world is rapidly closing in on a million deaths from COVID-19 and has surpassed 33 million cases, according to WHO numbers updated Monday.

“So we’ve already got this terrible virus, and as you said, we are reaching an awful milestone.”

Case numbers are rising in Canada and in many countries around the world. On Monday, Canada recorded 1,450 new cases in just Ontario and Quebec. Ontario’s 700 new cases is the highest single-day COVID-19 increase ever recorded in the province.

Canada has now recorded 154,575 cases and 9,270 deaths, according to figures compiled by CTV News. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said last week that a second wave is already underway in most of Canada that could make the fall “much worse” than the spring.

Canada’s seven-day tally of new cases – 8,897 – places it No. 26 on that score, according to WHO numbers. The U.S. ranks worst, with 305,412 new cases in the last week, bringing its total to more than 7 million. 

The WHO has called surging coronavirus cases in Europe a “very serious situation.”

Harris says caseloads are rising because people are spending more time together, and holding more mass gatherings.

As COVID-19 numbers climb, it will place a heavy burden on hospitals that will also be dealing with seasonal illnesses. Cold weather can even bring an uptick in heart attacks because cold weather can constrict the flow of blood to the heart.

“Your hospitals won’t be able to deal with all the things they have to do,” said Harris. “So that’s why it’s so critical to really suppress transmission of this virus right now.”

It’s just as important to seek out knowledge from reputable sources, says Harris, including the WHO, national health departments, and universities.

“One of the biggest problems right now is that misinformation is flying around the world a lot more quickly than the right information,” she said.

“We all hear all sorts of stuff from friends and neighbours and social media and everything else, but go check it first, and before you pass anything check whether it’s true.”

Harris says there is reason to be optimistic on the vaccine front.

The WHO is tracking more than 170 COVID-19 vaccine candidates that are being developed and tested around the world.

“Never have there been so many vaccines, so many scientists, so many groups working so hard to create such an important tool for humanity.”

Nine vaccines are in Phase 3 clinical trials, says Harris, meaning they are being tested to see if they work “out in the wild” to protect against transmission of the virus.

“To really know that, you have to give it to a lot of people, between 30,000 and 60,000. And half of them have to get the vaccine and half of them have to get something else, and you look to see if there is a difference.”

To be really effective, the trial needs to be “double blinded,” where neither the researchers nor the trial participants know whether or not they got the vaccine.

Harris says it’s expected that results from the first of the Phase 3 trials will begin to be known at the end of this year or early next year.

“It’s still a while yet, but it’s still very good news.” 

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Ontario sees single-day record of 700 new COVID-19 cases as calls grow to return to Stage 2 – CBC.ca

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Ontario Premier Doug Ford called the province’s record-setting new COVID-19 case count Monday “deeply concerning,” but announced no new public health measures, despite a group of doctors and medical experts calling for a return to Stage 2. 

The province reported an additional 700 cases of coronavirus on Monday, the most on a single day since the outbreak began in late January. 

Speaking to reporters, Ford said Ontario is indeed embarking on its second wave, which will be “more complicated, more complex — it’ll be worse” than the first.

Still, asked about calls by the Ontario Hospital Association (OHA) to re-implement restrictions meant to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus, Health Minister Christine Elliott said, “We don’t want to turn back a stage unless we absolutely have to.”

As for how high the case count needs to climb to get to that point, Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. David Williams wouldn’t say. Williams suggested the province is considering “targeted” measures, but didn’t specify what measures might be under consideration, where, or at what point they might be implemented. 

WATCH | ‘We’re in the second wave,’ Ford says of COVID-19 pandemic in Ontario:

Ontario is now in the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, Premier Doug Ford and health officials said Monday. 1:21

At a news conference Wednesday afternoon, Williams reiterated the importance of wearing masks and washing hands, urging Ontarians to limit their contact with people and only attend essential gatherings — even though most businesses and establishments in the province are open.

Williams also cautioned against contact with anyone who is not taking the risk of COVID-19 or the associated public health guidance seriously.

“I would avoid contact with those people,” he said. “They may be someone you know.”

Also Monday, Williams urged the public against “nice-to-know” testing, saying the province is working to increase testing capacity. Until that happens, he insisted testing should be done on a “need-to-know” basis, meaning anyone seeking a test who does not fall into the current testing criteria should not be tested right now.

The province also announced the recruitment of 3,700 more health-care workers and caregivers, including nurses and personal support workers (PSWs), at a price tag of $52 million.

“Your province needs you right now,” Ford said, calling for more Ontarians to consider becoming health-care workers.

Monday’s count of new cases surpasses the previous high of 640, which came on April 24, when community transmission of the virus was thought to be at its peak in the province.

A majority of newly confirmed cases are concentrated in four public health units:

  • Toronto: 344
  • Peel Region: 104
  • Ottawa: 89
  • York Region: 56

Other areas with double-digit increases include:

  • Niagara Region: 20
  • Halton Region: 15
  • Hamilton: 13
  • Simcoe Muskoka: 12

Elliott said in a series of tweets that about 60 per cent of new cases today were found in people under 40 years old.

Thirty-six are “school-related,” according to the ministry, including 27 students, three staff and six people categorized as “individuals not identified.” A total of 224 of Ontario’s 4,828 publicly funded schools, or about 4.64 per cent, have reported at least one case of the illness. 

The news comes as Ontario’s labs processed around 41,111 test samples for the illness, with another 49,586 in the queue waiting to be completed. The positivity rate in today’s report is 1.7 per cent, markedly higher than on any day since the province ramped up testing significantly in June. 

More than 40,000 test samples have been processed on each of the last four days. Elliott has previously said the province hopes to reach capacity for up to 50,000 tests per day in the coming weeks.

(CBC)

The number of people in Ontario hospitals with confirmed cases of COVID-19 continues to steadily rise, and now sits at 128. Twenty-eight of those patients are being treated in intensive care, while 17 are on ventilators.

Further, data from some 40 hospitals around the province was not submitted in time to be included in today’s report, the ministry says.

Meanwhile, 44 long-term care facilities throughout the province are reporting outbreaks, a figure that has been slowly increasing in recent weeks. During the peak of COVID-19 cases in Ontario, long-term care residents accounted for about two-thirds of all deaths. 

Ontario has now seen a total of 50,531 confirmed cases of COVID-19 over the entirety of the outbreak. Of those, about 85.3 per cent are considered resolved. Another 331 were marked resolved in today’s update.

The province also recorded one new official COVID-19 death, putting its death toll at at 2,840. A CBC News count based on data from public health units, which helps avoid lag times in the provincial reporting system, puts the actual toll at 2,880.

There are currently about 5,571 confirmed, active infections of the novel coronavirus provincewide. The most active cases ever observed were 5,669 on April 23.

WATCH | Infectious disease specialist Isaac Bogoch explains if targeted restrictions will be enough to keep cases in check:

An infectious disease specialist answers questions about the COVID-19 pandemic including if targeted restrictions will be enough to keep cases down. 4:04

OHA calls for tighter restrictions

Shortly after the Ministry of Health published its daily report, the OHA released a statement calling for stricter public health measures in Toronto, the Greater Toronto Area and Ottawa.

“A return to Stage 2, with restriction on indoor dining and bars, places of worship, weddings, gyms, movie theatres and other non-essential businesses, is needed now to keep schools and prevent a further acceleration of infections,” said Anthony Dale, president and CEO of the organization. 

The OHA said it has heard from member hospitals that administrators and staff are concerned that a rise in infections will inevitably lead to higher admissions, putting unsustainable strain on resources and care.

“We’ve seen in jurisdictions around the world how acute care capacity can be easily overwhelmed if the number of positive cases rises too sharply,” the statement said.

“While Canada’s health-care system has many strengths, our capacity is limited, and we can no longer sustain a false sense of security and belief that this will not happen to us.”

Dale said the OHA understands how a return to Stage 2 in these areas could negatively impact businesses but said public health considerations must come first.

Several casinos reopen

Several Ontario casinos reopened on Monday, even as a surge in COVID-19 cases was reported in the province.

Great Canadian Gaming Corporation said it reopened 11 of its properties, including Casino Woodbine in Toronto and Casino Ajax.

Ontario allowed casinos to reopen as parts of the province moved into Stage Three of their pandemic response this summer. The province has, however, prohibited table games at the establishments.

Great Canadian Gaming said it will have a limit of 50 guests indoors at its casinos and is focused on reopening safely.


Still have questions about COVID-19? These CBC News stories will help.

Is another lockdown coming in Ontario? What do we know about the Ford government’s fall plan?

CBC Queen’s Park reporter Mike Crawley obtained a draft copy of the plan

What’s the latest on where I should get tested?

It’s confusing, but here’s an explainer complete with a flow chart

What’s the most recent guidance on mask use?

Reporter Lauren Pelley took a look at what the experts are advising

What should I do about my COVID-19 bubble?

With cases going up, even small gatherings are getting riskier

Who is getting COVID-19?

CBC News crunched the data from across Canada to get the clearest picture possible

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